A Coral Gables police officer asks me for a permit after I photograph him

I was standing on a sidewalk on Miracle Mile Thursday night carrying my Canon 5D with a 50 mm f/1.8 lens, a combination that works excellent in low light situations.

The officer was across the street standing on one of those motor scooters that police have nowadays that enable them to walk their beat without actually walking their beat.

As the officer was zipping across the street on the scooter, I took a few shots as I think it is hilarious that police have resorted to a child’s toy for law enforcement efficiency.

_mg_8279.jpg

“Do you have a permit to take photos?” he asked as he reached the sidewalk I was standing on.

“I don’t need a permit to take photos,” I responded, thinking this guy is either messing with my mind or extremely ignorant.

“Are you sure about that?””

“Yes”.

“100 percent sure?”

“150 percent sure.”

He proceeds to tell me that there is a city ordinance that prohibits photography in public without a permit. This being Coral Gables, one of the most permit-heavy municipalities in Miami-Dade County, I can see where maybe someone might believe that to be the case.

“Last time I checked, the First Amendment overrides all city ordinances,” I tell him.

The officer is looking very serious. Not angry or exasperated the way some officers get when you don’t treat their words as gospel. For a second, I thought I saw a hint of a smile, but I wasn’t sure.

“Are you fucking with me?” I ask.

“No, I’m serious, you need a permit. It is a city ordinance.”

“Please tell me which city ordinance I am violating?”

“I don’t remember right now.”

Then he busts out laughing. And I take his photo. And he admits he was only kidding.

_mg_8283.jpg

“I just like to talk to people,” he says.

Officer Rios turned out to be a really cool guy. We spent a few minutes talking about photography, police work and traveling before a South Florida rain shower sent us running (or scooting) for shelter.

_mg_8291.jpg

He spent seven years working for NYPD before moving to Miami and becoming a Coral Gables officer less than three years ago. I’ve had good experiences with NYPD and have known them to have a good sense of humor, something that most Miami cops lack.

A permit to take photographs in Coral Gables. Fucking hilarious.184

- Advertisement -

I was standing on a sidewalk on Miracle Mile Thursday night carrying my Canon 5D with a 50 mm f/1.8 lens, a combination that works excellent in low light situations.

The officer was across the street standing on one of those motor scooters that police have nowadays that enable them to walk their beat without actually walking their beat.

As the officer was zipping across the street on the scooter, I took a few shots as I think it is hilarious that police have resorted to a child’s toy for law enforcement efficiency.

_mg_8279.jpg

“Do you have a permit to take photos?” he asked as he reached the sidewalk I was standing on.

“I don’t need a permit to take photos,” I responded, thinking this guy is either messing with my mind or extremely ignorant.

“Are you sure about that?””

“Yes”.

“100 percent sure?”

“150 percent sure.”

He proceeds to tell me that there is a city ordinance that prohibits photography in public without a permit. This being Coral Gables, one of the most permit-heavy municipalities in Miami-Dade County, I can see where maybe someone might believe that to be the case.

“Last time I checked, the First Amendment overrides all city ordinances,” I tell him.

The officer is looking very serious. Not angry or exasperated the way some officers get when you don’t treat their words as gospel. For a second, I thought I saw a hint of a smile, but I wasn’t sure.

“Are you fucking with me?” I ask.

“No, I’m serious, you need a permit. It is a city ordinance.”

“Please tell me which city ordinance I am violating?”

“I don’t remember right now.”

- Advertisement -

Then he busts out laughing. And I take his photo. And he admits he was only kidding.

_mg_8283.jpg

“I just like to talk to people,” he says.

Officer Rios turned out to be a really cool guy. We spent a few minutes talking about photography, police work and traveling before a South Florida rain shower sent us running (or scooting) for shelter.

_mg_8291.jpg

He spent seven years working for NYPD before moving to Miami and becoming a Coral Gables officer less than three years ago. I’ve had good experiences with NYPD and have known them to have a good sense of humor, something that most Miami cops lack.

A permit to take photographs in Coral Gables. Fucking hilarious.184

- Advertisement -

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Miller
Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles