Student tasered for asking the wrong questions

University of Florida student Andrew Meyer asked John Kerry the questions that have been on the minds of many Americans since the 2004 election.

Specifically, why did the presidential candidate concede the election when there were widespread reports of black voter disenfranchisement?

Why did he concede when there were widespread reports of voter machine miscounts?

And why hasn’t he called for an impeachment of the president?

Meyer topped these questions off by asking Kerry if he, like George W. Bush, was a member of Skull and Bones; the Masonic-inspired secret organization that has existed at Yale University since the 1800s.

That was when two University of Florida campus police officers walked up to him and grabbed his arms, one of them attempting to twist his right arm behind his back. Meyer resisted the officers’ attempt to subdue him, repeatedly yelling out, “what did I do?”

Meyer’s crime apparently was that he had asked more than one question. The rules stated that only one question was allowed per audience member. The unwritten rule no doubt stated that this single question should not cause Kerry any discomfort.

In this NBC6 video, you can see Meyer resisting the officers’ attempt to arrest him by lifting his arms and walking away from the officers, continuing to ask, “What did I do?”

Meyer was handcuffed and lying on the ground when police tasered him, causing him to yell out in pain. At least six officers surrounded the 21-year-old student.

The sad part is not necessarily that the cops tasered him after he was already in custody. That is typical police behavior that happens every day, occasionally getting caught on video.

The truly sad part is that students applauded when police initially confronted Meyer at the microphone. They did not appreciate that one of their own had broken the rules by asking more than one question. Or perhaps they did not appreciate Meyer’s lack of conformity about the nation’s state of affairs.

For those of you who applauded, you should be ashamed of yourselves because once you stop demanding honesty and accountability from politicians, you give up on democracy.

I hope you never step foot in the voting booth.200

University of Florida student Andrew Meyer asked John Kerry the questions that have been on the minds of many Americans since the 2004 election.

Specifically, why did the presidential candidate concede the election when there were widespread reports of black voter disenfranchisement?

Why did he concede when there were widespread reports of voter machine miscounts?

And why hasn’t he called for an impeachment of the president?

Meyer topped these questions off by asking Kerry if he, like George W. Bush, was a member of Skull and Bones; the Masonic-inspired secret organization that has existed at Yale University since the 1800s.

That was when two University of Florida campus police officers walked up to him and grabbed his arms, one of them attempting to twist his right arm behind his back. Meyer resisted the officers’ attempt to subdue him, repeatedly yelling out, “what did I do?”

Meyer’s crime apparently was that he had asked more than one question. The rules stated that only one question was allowed per audience member. The unwritten rule no doubt stated that this single question should not cause Kerry any discomfort.

In this NBC6 video, you can see Meyer resisting the officers’ attempt to arrest him by lifting his arms and walking away from the officers, continuing to ask, “What did I do?”

Meyer was handcuffed and lying on the ground when police tasered him, causing him to yell out in pain. At least six officers surrounded the 21-year-old student.

The sad part is not necessarily that the cops tasered him after he was already in custody. That is typical police behavior that happens every day, occasionally getting caught on video.

The truly sad part is that students applauded when police initially confronted Meyer at the microphone. They did not appreciate that one of their own had broken the rules by asking more than one question. Or perhaps they did not appreciate Meyer’s lack of conformity about the nation’s state of affairs.

For those of you who applauded, you should be ashamed of yourselves because once you stop demanding honesty and accountability from politicians, you give up on democracy.

I hope you never step foot in the voting booth.200

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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