Only if the New York Times promises to bail me out of jail

Carlos Miller

Like many news organizations these days, The New York Times is asking its readers to do its work for them.

Its latest venture is a program cleverly titled “Polling Place Photo Project” in which they are asking readers to submit photos (free, of course) of polling places throughout the United States during the primaries and general elections.

“By documenting local voting experiences, online users can contribute to an archive of photographs that captures the richness and complexity of voting in America,” stated a Times press release, neglecting to mention that it would also save them a bundle from actually hiring photographers.

The creators of this project obviously have never been down to Florida, where basic First Amendment rights like photographing the democratic process will immediately lead to police tackling and arresting you.

In 2004, photographer James S. Henry was photographing voters outside a polling place in West Palm Beach when he had the misfortune of encountering sheriff’s deputy Al Cinque.

Cinque ordered Henry to stop photographing and tried to grab his camera. According to witnesses, Henry ran off and the deputy tackled him, punching him in the back. When Henry tried to pull out some identification cards, the deputy punched him again.

Cinque’s claim that Henry “tripped and fell” is not only one of the oldest lines in the Code Blue book, it was also refuted by countless witnesses.

Henry was arrested for disorderly conduct – an old standby when police can’t think of any actual laws that were broken – and resisting arrest without violence.

The charges were eventually dropped.

So my message to The New York Times is I would gladly photograph polling places for you, but only on two conditions:

  1. You pay me my photographer’s daily rate.
  2. You pay for all my legal expenses, including bail, when I do wind up in jail.

Thanks again to Enhager for the tip.

Carlos Miller

Like many news organizations these days, The New York Times is asking its readers to do its work for them.

Its latest venture is a program cleverly titled “Polling Place Photo Project” in which they are asking readers to submit photos (free, of course) of polling places throughout the United States during the primaries and general elections.

“By documenting local voting experiences, online users can contribute to an archive of photographs that captures the richness and complexity of voting in America,” stated a Times press release, neglecting to mention that it would also save them a bundle from actually hiring photographers.

The creators of this project obviously have never been down to Florida, where basic First Amendment rights like photographing the democratic process will immediately lead to police tackling and arresting you.

In 2004, photographer James S. Henry was photographing voters outside a polling place in West Palm Beach when he had the misfortune of encountering sheriff’s deputy Al Cinque.

Cinque ordered Henry to stop photographing and tried to grab his camera. According to witnesses, Henry ran off and the deputy tackled him, punching him in the back. When Henry tried to pull out some identification cards, the deputy punched him again.

Cinque’s claim that Henry “tripped and fell” is not only one of the oldest lines in the Code Blue book, it was also refuted by countless witnesses.

Henry was arrested for disorderly conduct – an old standby when police can’t think of any actual laws that were broken – and resisting arrest without violence.

The charges were eventually dropped.

So my message to The New York Times is I would gladly photograph polling places for you, but only on two conditions:

  1. You pay me my photographer’s daily rate.
  2. You pay for all my legal expenses, including bail, when I do wind up in jail.

Thanks again to Enhager for the tip.

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For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

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But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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