Photograpy is Not a Crime: The Movie



You’ve read the blog, soon you will see the the movie.

I have been working with a local film group on a documentary about photographer’s rights and the First Amendment. The title of the film will naturally be Photography is not a Crime.

The movie is in its initial stages, but I have a solid crew who has agreed to work with me on this project, including Bruce Merwin, a veteran filmmaker with more than two decades of professional experience.

So far, we have conducted a few on-camera interviews including one with photojournalist Al Crespo, who is sitting far left in the top photo (I am wearing the headphones and the purple t-shirt).

In 2000, Crespo was photographing a rally during the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles when LAPD officers shot him several times with rubber bullets.

Below is the photo he shot right before he was shot. And below that, is a photo of Crespo’s wound after he was shot.

The American Civil Liberties Union sued on his behalf and won. Because of that incident, the LAPD had to change their policy when dealing with photojournalists.

Unfortunately, the LAPD did not heed that policy during last year’s May Day demonstration because they again turned Gestapo on photographers and demonstrators.

In the movie, we will interview several photographers who have had violent run-ins with police in their line of work. We also plan to interview judges, lawyers, activists and hopefully even police chiefs.

We also plan to have a video camera in the courtroom during my trial, which is now scheduled for June 16th.

And considering there are at least two news stations that also intend to film the trial, the camera shy prosecutors better be prepared because this time, they will not be allowed to delay the trial.

And we will also film scenes in which I am photographing federal buildings from a public sidewalk to see how long it takes for a police officer or security guard to order me to stop. The video camera will be hidden to allow natural interactions.

We are exploring and seeking different avenues of funding and sponsorship. And we are also seeking volunteers who would like to participate.

If interested, please join our Meetup Group.



You’ve read the blog, soon you will see the the movie.

I have been working with a local film group on a documentary about photographer’s rights and the First Amendment. The title of the film will naturally be Photography is not a Crime.

The movie is in its initial stages, but I have a solid crew who has agreed to work with me on this project, including Bruce Merwin, a veteran filmmaker with more than two decades of professional experience.

So far, we have conducted a few on-camera interviews including one with photojournalist Al Crespo, who is sitting far left in the top photo (I am wearing the headphones and the purple t-shirt).

In 2000, Crespo was photographing a rally during the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles when LAPD officers shot him several times with rubber bullets.

Below is the photo he shot right before he was shot. And below that, is a photo of Crespo’s wound after he was shot.

The American Civil Liberties Union sued on his behalf and won. Because of that incident, the LAPD had to change their policy when dealing with photojournalists.

Unfortunately, the LAPD did not heed that policy during last year’s May Day demonstration because they again turned Gestapo on photographers and demonstrators.

In the movie, we will interview several photographers who have had violent run-ins with police in their line of work. We also plan to interview judges, lawyers, activists and hopefully even police chiefs.

We also plan to have a video camera in the courtroom during my trial, which is now scheduled for June 16th.

And considering there are at least two news stations that also intend to film the trial, the camera shy prosecutors better be prepared because this time, they will not be allowed to delay the trial.

And we will also film scenes in which I am photographing federal buildings from a public sidewalk to see how long it takes for a police officer or security guard to order me to stop. The video camera will be hidden to allow natural interactions.

We are exploring and seeking different avenues of funding and sponsorship. And we are also seeking volunteers who would like to participate.

If interested, please join our Meetup Group.

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For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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