Cuban exile protest against “Che” shows dwindling hardliner numbers



First off, El Nuevo Herald is truly exaggerating when it claims 100 Cuban exiles protested the private screening of the Steven Soderberg’s movie “Che” on Miami Beach Thursday night.

At most, there was maybe 40 protesters protesting the movie about Che Guevara. And that’s stretching it.

But you know the old saying, “yo no creo en el Herald”.

And it was obvious they were completely out of their element because they did not show nearly the aggressiveness they normally show when they’re gathered at Versailles Cuban restaurant in Little Havana.

But one lady demanded to know if I was “liberal”, and when I told her yes, she demanded to know where I stand on the Castro issue because obviously liberalism and communism go hand in hand.

Yawn. Yes, it was pretty much an uneventful protest considering I did not get assaulted nor did the protesters chase Benicio del Toro away as they did Code Pink.

But still, I don’t understand why every time I film these people, a few of them always accuse me of being communist. It’s not like I have a beard and walk around in fatigues chomping on a cigar.

I think it’s because when they ask me my political leanings, I don’t hesitate to let them know exactly where I stand. And they are so used to people coddling to them in Miami, either out of fear or exasperation, that they get insulted that somebody doesn’t think just like them.

But on this night, the most dramatic moment came when I had to defend my democratic leanings in Spanish, which sometimes gets me tongue-tied, as you will see (or rather hear) in the video.



First off, El Nuevo Herald is truly exaggerating when it claims 100 Cuban exiles protested the private screening of the Steven Soderberg’s movie “Che” on Miami Beach Thursday night.

At most, there was maybe 40 protesters protesting the movie about Che Guevara. And that’s stretching it.

But you know the old saying, “yo no creo en el Herald”.

And it was obvious they were completely out of their element because they did not show nearly the aggressiveness they normally show when they’re gathered at Versailles Cuban restaurant in Little Havana.

But one lady demanded to know if I was “liberal”, and when I told her yes, she demanded to know where I stand on the Castro issue because obviously liberalism and communism go hand in hand.

Yawn. Yes, it was pretty much an uneventful protest considering I did not get assaulted nor did the protesters chase Benicio del Toro away as they did Code Pink.

But still, I don’t understand why every time I film these people, a few of them always accuse me of being communist. It’s not like I have a beard and walk around in fatigues chomping on a cigar.

I think it’s because when they ask me my political leanings, I don’t hesitate to let them know exactly where I stand. And they are so used to people coddling to them in Miami, either out of fear or exasperation, that they get insulted that somebody doesn’t think just like them.

But on this night, the most dramatic moment came when I had to defend my democratic leanings in Spanish, which sometimes gets me tongue-tied, as you will see (or rather hear) in the video.

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles