More police lies exposed by video cameras



Police brutality caught on video is becoming so commonplace that you think police would think twice before attacking people without provocation.

But it’s probably difficult to change years of unchained aggressiveness that has gone unenforced.

The latest incident shows three Ft. Lauderdale police officers attacking a 22-year-old man in an elevator. As always, police claimed the man had attacked them first.

After punching and tackling Joshua Daniel Ortiz, breaking his nose in the process, they charged him with felony battery on a law enforcement officer. Read the arrest report.

But after prosecutors reviewed surveillance video from the elevator, they reduced the felony to a misdemeanor. Upon further review, they dropped the charge altogether.

The Sun Sentinel, which reported the story, has a poll asking readers if the officers should be disciplined. Be sure to vote.



Police brutality caught on video is becoming so commonplace that you think police would think twice before attacking people without provocation.

But it’s probably difficult to change years of unchained aggressiveness that has gone unenforced.

The latest incident shows three Ft. Lauderdale police officers attacking a 22-year-old man in an elevator. As always, police claimed the man had attacked them first.

After punching and tackling Joshua Daniel Ortiz, breaking his nose in the process, they charged him with felony battery on a law enforcement officer. Read the arrest report.

But after prosecutors reviewed surveillance video from the elevator, they reduced the felony to a misdemeanor. Upon further review, they dropped the charge altogether.

The Sun Sentinel, which reported the story, has a poll asking readers if the officers should be disciplined. Be sure to vote.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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