AMC Theatres employee snatches phone from woman who photographed logo

They try to plaster their logos on everything from football stadiums to cheap give-away t-shirts, but the moment you snap a photo of that logo, they treat it as if it were some Pentagon top secret war plan.

It was only last month that I was told by Camel cigarette employees that I was not allowed to photograph their logo, even though I was standing on a public sidewalk where they were trying to get young adults hooked on their product.

The latest corporation to go Gestapo on photographers is AMC Theatres, the second largest movie theater chain in North America.

A woman named Chalicechick told Consumerist that she snapped a photo of a poster AMC had put up stating that children younger than six would no longer be allowed in R-rated movies after 6 p.m.

Chalicechick was so thrilled at the news that she took out her cell phone and photographed the poster. She happened to be standing outside at the ticket booth when she did this.

Then she walked inside and was confronted by an AMC employee in the lobby.

“You’re not allowed to take pictures of the AMC logo” she snapped.
I thought of pointing out the legal issues with that one, but I’d already paid for a ticket to the 3-d Alice in Wonderland and didn’t want to get kicked out.
“Um, OK” I said. My friend was late and I was standing in the lobby waiting for her. I was bored so I pulled out my phone.
“Are you taking pictures AGAIN?” the employee snapped, racing over.
Again, I was in the lobby. I guess I could have been taking a picture of a movie poster or the popcorn guy or something, but nothing remotely close to photographing a movie or anything actually illegal.
“I’m, um, looking at Twitter,” I said, holding up my phone.
She examined it intently, taking it out of my hand to make sure I wasn’t, in fact, photographing the popcorn guy. I had actually been looking at twitter, so she handed my phone back and my friend showed up and that was that.

First of all, there is no way in hell I would allow an AMC employee to snatch my phone out of my hand. I probably wouldn’t even let a cop do that.

Second of all, if I had been confronted by an employee for taking such a harmless photo, I would probably demand to speak to a manager and depending on how that went, I would probably end up demanding my money back.

And third of all, I would not be complimenting the company on my blog on their new policy. But Chalicechick still salutes them. Literally.

AMC Theatres, Chalicechick salutes you

Maybe she wants free movie tickets or something.

They try to plaster their logos on everything from football stadiums to cheap give-away t-shirts, but the moment you snap a photo of that logo, they treat it as if it were some Pentagon top secret war plan.

It was only last month that I was told by Camel cigarette employees that I was not allowed to photograph their logo, even though I was standing on a public sidewalk where they were trying to get young adults hooked on their product.

The latest corporation to go Gestapo on photographers is AMC Theatres, the second largest movie theater chain in North America.

A woman named Chalicechick told Consumerist that she snapped a photo of a poster AMC had put up stating that children younger than six would no longer be allowed in R-rated movies after 6 p.m.

Chalicechick was so thrilled at the news that she took out her cell phone and photographed the poster. She happened to be standing outside at the ticket booth when she did this.

Then she walked inside and was confronted by an AMC employee in the lobby.

“You’re not allowed to take pictures of the AMC logo” she snapped.
I thought of pointing out the legal issues with that one, but I’d already paid for a ticket to the 3-d Alice in Wonderland and didn’t want to get kicked out.
“Um, OK” I said. My friend was late and I was standing in the lobby waiting for her. I was bored so I pulled out my phone.
“Are you taking pictures AGAIN?” the employee snapped, racing over.
Again, I was in the lobby. I guess I could have been taking a picture of a movie poster or the popcorn guy or something, but nothing remotely close to photographing a movie or anything actually illegal.
“I’m, um, looking at Twitter,” I said, holding up my phone.
She examined it intently, taking it out of my hand to make sure I wasn’t, in fact, photographing the popcorn guy. I had actually been looking at twitter, so she handed my phone back and my friend showed up and that was that.

First of all, there is no way in hell I would allow an AMC employee to snatch my phone out of my hand. I probably wouldn’t even let a cop do that.

Second of all, if I had been confronted by an employee for taking such a harmless photo, I would probably demand to speak to a manager and depending on how that went, I would probably end up demanding my money back.

And third of all, I would not be complimenting the company on my blog on their new policy. But Chalicechick still salutes them. Literally.

AMC Theatres, Chalicechick salutes you

Maybe she wants free movie tickets or something.

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles