Philly Transit Cops Add Photog to Terrorist Database

While some of us celebrated the fact that the Department of Homeland Security acknowledged [__last week__](http://www.pixiq.com/article/feds-agree-to-settlement) that photographing public buildings is legal, most of us are unaware that the DHS is creating a national database of people committing “suspicious activity.”

This, of course, includes photographers.

Pennsylvania photographer Scott Frederick reports on [__his blog__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/exit) that he was confronted on Tuesday by two Philadelphia Transit police officers as he was taking pictures on his way down the stairs into the city’s subway.

The officers demanded his identification, informing him that he was going to be added to the “Terrorism Data Base.”

> I asked if it was against the law to photograph in the underground, and he said some song and dance about the Madrid bombings, etc. I figured I was going to receive a citation or a warning. I was asked for ID, and I cooperated with the officer. He then began to tell me how I was going to be added to the Terrorism Data Base. I couldn’t believe my ears, but I didn’t want to start any trouble.

This database is described in detail on the [__Center for Investigative Reporting.__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/20100921databaseofsuspiciousactivitygoinglivewithlittleattention)

> Federal officials are closer to establishing what amounts to a [__nationwide__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/nsi.ncirc.gov) database of so-called “suspicious activity reports” that describe possible evidence of terrorist attack planning. Reports will be submitted not just by state and local police and agencies within the Department of Homeland Security, but also private corporations that control economic and infrastructure assets considered high-profile targets for terrorists.
> A required public [__notice__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/2010-22636.htm) surfaced one day before the nine-year anniversary of Sept. 11 confirming that DHS would be finished implementing its own internal database of suspicious activity reports by mid-October. Contents will flow in from DHS personnel at the Coast Guard, Border Patrol, Transportation Security Administration and other agencies housed in the department.

I guess the thing to do is to refuse to provide identification if you know you are not breaking the law.

This could get you arrested — even though there is no legal basis for it — but it could also overwhelm the officers into releasing you, as we have [__seen__](http://www.pixiq.com/article/police-officer-accuses-men-of-crime-for-videotaping-them) in the [__past.__](http://www.pixiq.com/article/federal-officers-twice-fail-at-intimidating-photographer-videos)

While some of us celebrated the fact that the Department of Homeland Security acknowledged [__last week__](http://www.pixiq.com/article/feds-agree-to-settlement) that photographing public buildings is legal, most of us are unaware that the DHS is creating a national database of people committing “suspicious activity.”

This, of course, includes photographers.

Pennsylvania photographer Scott Frederick reports on [__his blog__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/exit) that he was confronted on Tuesday by two Philadelphia Transit police officers as he was taking pictures on his way down the stairs into the city’s subway.

The officers demanded his identification, informing him that he was going to be added to the “Terrorism Data Base.”

> I asked if it was against the law to photograph in the underground, and he said some song and dance about the Madrid bombings, etc. I figured I was going to receive a citation or a warning. I was asked for ID, and I cooperated with the officer. He then began to tell me how I was going to be added to the Terrorism Data Base. I couldn’t believe my ears, but I didn’t want to start any trouble.

This database is described in detail on the [__Center for Investigative Reporting.__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/20100921databaseofsuspiciousactivitygoinglivewithlittleattention)

> Federal officials are closer to establishing what amounts to a [__nationwide__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/nsi.ncirc.gov) database of so-called “suspicious activity reports” that describe possible evidence of terrorist attack planning. Reports will be submitted not just by state and local police and agencies within the Department of Homeland Security, but also private corporations that control economic and infrastructure assets considered high-profile targets for terrorists.
> A required public [__notice__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/2010-22636.htm) surfaced one day before the nine-year anniversary of Sept. 11 confirming that DHS would be finished implementing its own internal database of suspicious activity reports by mid-October. Contents will flow in from DHS personnel at the Coast Guard, Border Patrol, Transportation Security Administration and other agencies housed in the department.

I guess the thing to do is to refuse to provide identification if you know you are not breaking the law.

This could get you arrested — even though there is no legal basis for it — but it could also overwhelm the officers into releasing you, as we have [__seen__](http://www.pixiq.com/article/police-officer-accuses-men-of-crime-for-videotaping-them) in the [__past.__](http://www.pixiq.com/article/federal-officers-twice-fail-at-intimidating-photographer-videos)

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles