TSA Speedo Stripper Strikes Again

A college student named Jon who has been entering Transportation Security Administration checkpoints stripped down to nothing but Speedos was permanently banned from Jetblue when he attempted to do the same in JFK International Airport in New York City.

On Wednesday (or Monday depending which date in the video you believe), the student stripped down and was immediately told to put his clothes back on.

A TSA agent told him that he was committing indecent exposure, which is pretty far-fetched considering New York is one of at least two states in the country where a woman can legally be topless in public.

With the words “Down With Big Sis” scrawled on his naked back, Jon argued that he was not breaking the law nor TSA policy.

Then another TSA agent ordered him to turn off the camera – which we all know is [__an unlawful order.__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/redirect?q=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.tsa.gov%2F2009%2F03%2Fcan-i-take-photos-at-checkpoint-and.html&session_token=Jp0XxKkR1w1NRyGQ6xbeiG1xCEd8MTI5MjYzMzA3NQ%3D%3D)

The TSA agent ended up turning the camera away from the scene, so we’re only able to hear the audio.

Jon argues his right to videotape the TSA screening area, but the TSA agents are clueless and are waiting for Port Authority police to show up.

Police and TSA officials spend the next few minutes ordering him to put his clothes back on, but he continues arguing his right to wear nothing but Speedos.

Then they turn off the camera and Jon informs us that is when they threatened to arrest him with disorderly conduct – the old contempt-of-cop standby.

But Jon points out that he was, in fact, not committing disorderly conduct, according to the [__actual New York statute__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/ny3%28b%29.htm), which states the following:

> A person is guilty of disorderly conduct when, with intent to cause public inconvenience, annoyance or alarm, or recklessly creating a risk thereof:
> 1. He engages in fighting or in violent, tumultuous or threatening behavior;  or 
> 2. He makes unreasonable noise;  or 
> 3. In a public place, he uses abusive or obscene language, or makes an obscene gesture;  or
> 4. Without lawful authority, he disturbs any lawful assembly or meeting of persons;  or
> 5. He obstructs vehicular or pedestrian traffic;  or
> 6. He congregates with other persons in a public place and refuses to comply with a lawful order of the police to disperse;  or
> 7. He creates a hazardous or physically offensive condition by any act which serves no legitimate purpose.

He eventually turns the camera back on where we hear TSA officials tell him that they have contacted Jetblue security, who eventually ban him permanently from ever flying on the airline again because they believe he could be “a risk” once the plane is in flight.

But Jon has walked through TSA in his Speedos at least twice before, including last month in [__Salt Lake City__](http://www.pixiq.com/article/man-videotapes-himself-stripping-down-to-speedos) where he had some trouble, but they eventually let him walk through and a second time at [__LAX International Airport__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/with-department-of-homeland-securitys.html) in Los Angeles where nobody said a word to him.

A college student named Jon who has been entering Transportation Security Administration checkpoints stripped down to nothing but Speedos was permanently banned from Jetblue when he attempted to do the same in JFK International Airport in New York City.

On Wednesday (or Monday depending which date in the video you believe), the student stripped down and was immediately told to put his clothes back on.

A TSA agent told him that he was committing indecent exposure, which is pretty far-fetched considering New York is one of at least two states in the country where a woman can legally be topless in public.

With the words “Down With Big Sis” scrawled on his naked back, Jon argued that he was not breaking the law nor TSA policy.

Then another TSA agent ordered him to turn off the camera – which we all know is [__an unlawful order.__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/redirect?q=http%3A%2F%2Fblog.tsa.gov%2F2009%2F03%2Fcan-i-take-photos-at-checkpoint-and.html&session_token=Jp0XxKkR1w1NRyGQ6xbeiG1xCEd8MTI5MjYzMzA3NQ%3D%3D)

The TSA agent ended up turning the camera away from the scene, so we’re only able to hear the audio.

Jon argues his right to videotape the TSA screening area, but the TSA agents are clueless and are waiting for Port Authority police to show up.

Police and TSA officials spend the next few minutes ordering him to put his clothes back on, but he continues arguing his right to wear nothing but Speedos.

Then they turn off the camera and Jon informs us that is when they threatened to arrest him with disorderly conduct – the old contempt-of-cop standby.

But Jon points out that he was, in fact, not committing disorderly conduct, according to the [__actual New York statute__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/ny3%28b%29.htm), which states the following:

> A person is guilty of disorderly conduct when, with intent to cause public inconvenience, annoyance or alarm, or recklessly creating a risk thereof:
> 1. He engages in fighting or in violent, tumultuous or threatening behavior;  or 
> 2. He makes unreasonable noise;  or 
> 3. In a public place, he uses abusive or obscene language, or makes an obscene gesture;  or
> 4. Without lawful authority, he disturbs any lawful assembly or meeting of persons;  or
> 5. He obstructs vehicular or pedestrian traffic;  or
> 6. He congregates with other persons in a public place and refuses to comply with a lawful order of the police to disperse;  or
> 7. He creates a hazardous or physically offensive condition by any act which serves no legitimate purpose.

He eventually turns the camera back on where we hear TSA officials tell him that they have contacted Jetblue security, who eventually ban him permanently from ever flying on the airline again because they believe he could be “a risk” once the plane is in flight.

But Jon has walked through TSA in his Speedos at least twice before, including last month in [__Salt Lake City__](http://www.pixiq.com/article/man-videotapes-himself-stripping-down-to-speedos) where he had some trouble, but they eventually let him walk through and a second time at [__LAX International Airport__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/with-department-of-homeland-securitys.html) in Los Angeles where nobody said a word to him.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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