Here Is The Full, Unedited, Uncensored And Uninterrupted Video Police

I’ve managed to recover the entire video clip that was deleted by police after they arrested me last week while covering the Occupy Miami eviction.

Unlike [__the video__](https://photographyisnotacrime.com/2012/article/here-is-the-recovered-video-police-deleted-of-my-arrest) I posted on Saturday, which was compiled of fragmented clips that left some gaps in the footage, this one should leave no doubt that I was not resisting police or creating a confrontation for the purpose of getting arrested, as I’ve been accused of on some other sites.

Now that I am able to see the entire clip, it is obvious police deleted a single file on my camera, which just happened to be the one I recorded as I was getting arrested.

The next step is determining the exact time it was deleted, which should not be difficult, according to several forensics specialists I’ve been in contact with.

The clip shows that the activists had already dispersed, but police were marching another block in military formation to make sure they were all gone.

The recovered clip actually picks up from the final scene in the video below, which I had originally posted on [__Miami Beach 411__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/occupy-miami-eviction), that shows the activists scattering after being threatened with arrest.

I remained on the scene because all the other journalists had remained. And the cops in riot gear didn’t seem to have an issue with me or the other journalists, including at :55 in the video when the cops bypass Marice Cohn Band from the Miami Herald, who is standing to the extreme right of the frame.

After the cops had marched to the end of the block, they fell out of formation because the operation was already over. You can see a few cops run up, peer down the street and say, “there’s a bunch over there,” but they didn’t appear too concerned with the activists at that point.

I was shooting half-heartedly at this point, knowing that unless something major happened, it wouldn’t make it in my final video.

Little did I know.

I started walking on the sidewalk back towards my car, passing the television videographer whom I believed recorded my arrest, as well as Glenn Garvin from the Miami Herald who witnessed by arrest and described it in [__this article.__](http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/01/31/2618332/cops-break-up-occupy-miami-camp.html)

I came across Major Nancy Perez, who stepped in front of me. I didn’t realize she was trying to detain me, so I tried to walk past her, which was when she put her arm across my stomach to stop me.

That is when I explain I was walking back to my car and that is when she tells me, “it doesn’t work that way” and began calling for the other officers to arrest me.

I initially had reported that she started yelling “arrestee,” but it was the male cop who yelled it after she gave the order. She was yelling, “39,” which is police code for arrestee.

That prompted several other cops to run up and begin frisking me, ordering me to “let go” to which I responded, “I’m not holding on to anything.”

They began tearing at the Canon 5D and the Canon XA 10 cameras I had strapped on me as well as my back pack, which was when she said, “we don’t want to have to hurt you” when they didn’t come right off.

Perez, who is a [__public information officer__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/miami-dade-cop-who-arrested-me-is-media-spokesperson), doesn’t appear to be well respected among fellow officers at the Miami-Dade Police Department, judging by comments left on [__Leo Affairs__](http://forums.leoaffairs.com/viewtopic.php?f=388&t=131119&sid=541bb04bbed0e575d214c926c5994d0c) about the incident, who say she is in “way, way over her hysterical head” for what they’ve seen of her throughout the years.

On the arrest report, it states I was charged with resisting arrest without violence, but the statute phrases it as [__“resisting officer without violence,”__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/0843.02.html) which punishable by up to a year in jail and is described below:

> Resisting officer without violence to his or her person.—Whoever shall resist, obstruct, or oppose any officer as defined in s. 943.10(1), (2), (3), (6), (7), (8), or (9); member of the Parole Commission or any administrative aide or supervisor employed by the commission; county probation officer; parole and probation supervisor; personnel or representative of the Department of Law Enforcement; or other person legally authorized to execute process in the execution of legal process or in the lawful execution of any legal duty, without offering or doing violence to the person of the officer, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor of the first degree,

I used [__Stellar Phoenix__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/3000-2248_4-10398932.html) recovery software for the first recovery, which has proven to be unable to recover large files in its entirety. I used [__PhotoRec__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/PhotoRec) for the second recovery, which did the job. PhotoRec has a steeper learning curve than Stellar Phoenix, but it’s free, unlike the former.

One of my next steps is identifying the man below, who is the videographer I believe recorded my arrest.

But I have much more than that up my sleeve.

*Please send stories, tips and videos to* [*__carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com__*](mailto:carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com)

I’ve managed to recover the entire video clip that was deleted by police after they arrested me last week while covering the Occupy Miami eviction.

Unlike [__the video__](https://photographyisnotacrime.com/2012/article/here-is-the-recovered-video-police-deleted-of-my-arrest) I posted on Saturday, which was compiled of fragmented clips that left some gaps in the footage, this one should leave no doubt that I was not resisting police or creating a confrontation for the purpose of getting arrested, as I’ve been accused of on some other sites.

Now that I am able to see the entire clip, it is obvious police deleted a single file on my camera, which just happened to be the one I recorded as I was getting arrested.

The next step is determining the exact time it was deleted, which should not be difficult, according to several forensics specialists I’ve been in contact with.

The clip shows that the activists had already dispersed, but police were marching another block in military formation to make sure they were all gone.

The recovered clip actually picks up from the final scene in the video below, which I had originally posted on [__Miami Beach 411__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/occupy-miami-eviction), that shows the activists scattering after being threatened with arrest.

I remained on the scene because all the other journalists had remained. And the cops in riot gear didn’t seem to have an issue with me or the other journalists, including at :55 in the video when the cops bypass Marice Cohn Band from the Miami Herald, who is standing to the extreme right of the frame.

After the cops had marched to the end of the block, they fell out of formation because the operation was already over. You can see a few cops run up, peer down the street and say, “there’s a bunch over there,” but they didn’t appear too concerned with the activists at that point.

I was shooting half-heartedly at this point, knowing that unless something major happened, it wouldn’t make it in my final video.

Little did I know.

I started walking on the sidewalk back towards my car, passing the television videographer whom I believed recorded my arrest, as well as Glenn Garvin from the Miami Herald who witnessed by arrest and described it in [__this article.__](http://www.miamiherald.com/2012/01/31/2618332/cops-break-up-occupy-miami-camp.html)

I came across Major Nancy Perez, who stepped in front of me. I didn’t realize she was trying to detain me, so I tried to walk past her, which was when she put her arm across my stomach to stop me.

That is when I explain I was walking back to my car and that is when she tells me, “it doesn’t work that way” and began calling for the other officers to arrest me.

I initially had reported that she started yelling “arrestee,” but it was the male cop who yelled it after she gave the order. She was yelling, “39,” which is police code for arrestee.

That prompted several other cops to run up and begin frisking me, ordering me to “let go” to which I responded, “I’m not holding on to anything.”

They began tearing at the Canon 5D and the Canon XA 10 cameras I had strapped on me as well as my back pack, which was when she said, “we don’t want to have to hurt you” when they didn’t come right off.

Perez, who is a [__public information officer__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/miami-dade-cop-who-arrested-me-is-media-spokesperson), doesn’t appear to be well respected among fellow officers at the Miami-Dade Police Department, judging by comments left on [__Leo Affairs__](http://forums.leoaffairs.com/viewtopic.php?f=388&t=131119&sid=541bb04bbed0e575d214c926c5994d0c) about the incident, who say she is in “way, way over her hysterical head” for what they’ve seen of her throughout the years.

On the arrest report, it states I was charged with resisting arrest without violence, but the statute phrases it as [__“resisting officer without violence,”__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/0843.02.html) which punishable by up to a year in jail and is described below:

> Resisting officer without violence to his or her person.—Whoever shall resist, obstruct, or oppose any officer as defined in s. 943.10(1), (2), (3), (6), (7), (8), or (9); member of the Parole Commission or any administrative aide or supervisor employed by the commission; county probation officer; parole and probation supervisor; personnel or representative of the Department of Law Enforcement; or other person legally authorized to execute process in the execution of legal process or in the lawful execution of any legal duty, without offering or doing violence to the person of the officer, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor of the first degree,

I used [__Stellar Phoenix__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/3000-2248_4-10398932.html) recovery software for the first recovery, which has proven to be unable to recover large files in its entirety. I used [__PhotoRec__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/PhotoRec) for the second recovery, which did the job. PhotoRec has a steeper learning curve than Stellar Phoenix, but it’s free, unlike the former.

One of my next steps is identifying the man below, who is the videographer I believe recorded my arrest.

But I have much more than that up my sleeve.

*Please send stories, tips and videos to* [*__carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com__*](mailto:carlosmiller@magiccitymedia.com)

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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