Colorado Police Arrest Woman After She Video Records Them

Once again, police lost control after a citizen pulled out a video camera as they were trying to make an arrest.

This time the incident took place in Colorado when a pair of Aurora police officers were making an arrest in what appears to be the hallway of an apartment complex.

The woman recording was standing several feet away from the officers where it was clear she was not interfering.

However, the officers continually ordered her to step inside her apartment.

Eventually they came after her and arrested her, charging her with resisting arrest and disorderly conduct, which in this case, obviously means recording them against their wishes.

Details are scarce but KUSA News reporter Jeremy Jojola, who is a longtime *Photography is Not a Crime* reader, posted it on his [__Facebook page__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/189736437804322) a few minutes ago.

He will provide full details during the 6 p.m. MST broadcast, which is in about ten minutes. I will update this post accordingly.

Police told Jojola that the woman was resisting before the video started running, which is hard to believe.

The family said police were the ones who overreacted, which is pretty obvious from the video.

**UPDATE:** Here is [__Jojola’s report:__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Cellphone-video-shows-chaotic-police-encounter-)

> The cellphone video was recorded by Vanessa Watkines at her uncle’s apartment complex in Aurora Monday night as her uncle was being arrested by police.
> “I proceeded to videotape the officer. They let me know I was under arrest for videotaping them and they wanted my phone,” Vanessa Watkines said.
> In the video, police don’t reference the cellphone but could be heard telling Vanessa Watkines she’s under arrest as they placed her uncle in handcuffs.
> Vanessa Watkines was recording the arrest of, Johnnie Watkines, 50, who refused to let police into his home without a warrant.

Once again, police lost control after a citizen pulled out a video camera as they were trying to make an arrest.

This time the incident took place in Colorado when a pair of Aurora police officers were making an arrest in what appears to be the hallway of an apartment complex.

The woman recording was standing several feet away from the officers where it was clear she was not interfering.

However, the officers continually ordered her to step inside her apartment.

Eventually they came after her and arrested her, charging her with resisting arrest and disorderly conduct, which in this case, obviously means recording them against their wishes.

Details are scarce but KUSA News reporter Jeremy Jojola, who is a longtime *Photography is Not a Crime* reader, posted it on his [__Facebook page__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/189736437804322) a few minutes ago.

He will provide full details during the 6 p.m. MST broadcast, which is in about ten minutes. I will update this post accordingly.

Police told Jojola that the woman was resisting before the video started running, which is hard to believe.

The family said police were the ones who overreacted, which is pretty obvious from the video.

**UPDATE:** Here is [__Jojola’s report:__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Cellphone-video-shows-chaotic-police-encounter-)

> The cellphone video was recorded by Vanessa Watkines at her uncle’s apartment complex in Aurora Monday night as her uncle was being arrested by police.
> “I proceeded to videotape the officer. They let me know I was under arrest for videotaping them and they wanted my phone,” Vanessa Watkines said.
> In the video, police don’t reference the cellphone but could be heard telling Vanessa Watkines she’s under arrest as they placed her uncle in handcuffs.
> Vanessa Watkines was recording the arrest of, Johnnie Watkines, 50, who refused to let police into his home without a warrant.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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