CT St Trooper Arrested after Caught on Camera Stealing from Dead Man

Knowing he was being audio and video recorded, a Connecticut State Trooper boldly took at least $3,700 in cash from a man who had died in a motorcycle accident, claiming it was “evidence,” but then acting as if he knew nothing about it when confronted three times by the victim’s father.

Trooper Aaron Huntsman also took a gold chain valued at $5,500, neglecting to include it in the victim’s personal belongings that he returned to the man’s family, later claiming he had forgotten all about it.

As a result, Huntsman was arrested on several felonies last month.

The [__15-page arrest warrant__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Aaron-Huntsman-arrest-warrant.pdf) goes into great detail at the evidence mounted against Huntsman, which includes witness statements as well as the audio recording from a device he was wearing on his uniform and the video from his own dash cam.

It also reveals that one of the main witnesses, Connecticut State Trooper Mark DiCocco, was evasive when initially confronted by investigators about witnessing Huntsman taking the money, saying he had no recollection about that moment.

But then DiCocco urged investigators to check out the dash cam video from Huntsman’s car to find their evidence, pointing to the specific frame where he refused to accept the money from a paramedic in the back of an ambulance, which was when Hunstman stepped in and took it as evidence.

A month after taking the money, investigators sat down with Huntsman and interrogated him about the missing cash, in which he denied any knowledge about it. He finally admitted to the possibility of taking it when confronted with the video, but still insisting he had no recollection in doing so.

The following day, investigators searched his patrol car and found $3,700 in a bundle under the seat. He was arrested more than a month later.

Knowing he was being audio and video recorded, a Connecticut State Trooper boldly took at least $3,700 in cash from a man who had died in a motorcycle accident, claiming it was “evidence,” but then acting as if he knew nothing about it when confronted three times by the victim’s father.

Trooper Aaron Huntsman also took a gold chain valued at $5,500, neglecting to include it in the victim’s personal belongings that he returned to the man’s family, later claiming he had forgotten all about it.

As a result, Huntsman was arrested on several felonies last month.

The [__15-page arrest warrant__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/Aaron-Huntsman-arrest-warrant.pdf) goes into great detail at the evidence mounted against Huntsman, which includes witness statements as well as the audio recording from a device he was wearing on his uniform and the video from his own dash cam.

It also reveals that one of the main witnesses, Connecticut State Trooper Mark DiCocco, was evasive when initially confronted by investigators about witnessing Huntsman taking the money, saying he had no recollection about that moment.

But then DiCocco urged investigators to check out the dash cam video from Huntsman’s car to find their evidence, pointing to the specific frame where he refused to accept the money from a paramedic in the back of an ambulance, which was when Hunstman stepped in and took it as evidence.

A month after taking the money, investigators sat down with Huntsman and interrogated him about the missing cash, in which he denied any knowledge about it. He finally admitted to the possibility of taking it when confronted with the video, but still insisting he had no recollection in doing so.

The following day, investigators searched his patrol car and found $3,700 in a bundle under the seat. He was arrested more than a month later.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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