Texas Cops Arrest Man for Video Recording,

A Texas cop arrested a man for video recording him as they were making an arrest, ordering the man to either delete the video or hand it over as “evidence.”

The Cisco police officer then stormed up to another person who was recording and tried to rip the phone out of his hands.

But that phone apparently ended up in the hands of a woman, who continued recording.

The 3:22 video is chaotic and doesn’t explain much, but it shows enough to prove that the Cisco Police Department has no regard for the rights of citizens to record them.

The Cisco Police Department released a statement justifying the arrests:

> One of the officers noticed several of the persons on scene were recording events on cell phones and felt compelled to take the phones because he believed that they may contain evidence of interference with public duties of a police officer and resisting arrest.

But if they were so concerned about evidence, the cop would not have ordered the man to delete the footage in the first place.

However, logic has never been a necessary component in the Police PR Spin Machine.

According to the local new site, [__Big Country:__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/-p5dOv5-BUSGiH1JmAHtfQ)

> Quintin Long was on scene while a person with a felony warrant was being arrested. He started to record the incident with his personal cell phone. As seen in the cell phone video, the police officer did not want him to do that.
> In cell phone video captured on scene, the officer says “either give me the phone or delete the video. it’s one of the two.”
> Although the officer did not have a search warrant, he continued to demand Quintin’s cell phone.
> Quintin refused to hand over the phone and the officer began threatening to arrest him. Captured in the cell phone video, the officer says, “You’ll give it to me or I’ll arrest you too.”
> According to the Cisco Police Department, the cell phone was believed to be evidence. They released this in a statement earlier today:
> “One of the officers noticed several of the persons on scene were recording events on cell phones and felt compelled to take the phones because he believed that they may contain evidence of interference with public duties of a police officer and resisting arrest.
> But evidence or not, an attorney Randy Wilson says it is against the law to take the phone without a search warrant.
> “In order to view the contains of a cell phone, they have to have probable cause and get a search warrant issued. The fact that a person is under arrest, or even just detained, does not give the police officer the right to go into the cell phone and look at things that are on the cell phone.”

In the video, a cop can be heard at :16 saying, “anybody who is recording, I’m going to need your cell phones as evidence.”

A cop then walks up to Long, telling him, “either give me the phone or delete the video.”

That prompted another person recording, described as a 14-year-old boy on the initial Facebook video, to say, ‘I’m not deleting any video and I’m not giving you the phone.”

And that prompted the cop, whose name is apparently Turner, to storm up to him.

“You give it me or I’ll arrest you too,” the cop told him before reaching out to snag the phone.

But during the struggle, it appears as if the phone ended up in the hands of a woman.

Eventually, several people were arrested in the incident that may have taken place this week, but it is not confirmed in the video or the news report.

The initial Facebook video, posted on [__Counter Current News__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/video.php?v=597128903765227), says it was recorded by Quintin Long. But the news report identifies Long as the 20-year-old man initially threatened for recording, not the 14-year-old boy who apparently recorded this video.

Call the Cisco Police Department at (254) 442-1770 or leave a comment on its [__Facebook page.__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/1455625334663417)

A Texas cop arrested a man for video recording him as they were making an arrest, ordering the man to either delete the video or hand it over as “evidence.”

The Cisco police officer then stormed up to another person who was recording and tried to rip the phone out of his hands.

But that phone apparently ended up in the hands of a woman, who continued recording.

The 3:22 video is chaotic and doesn’t explain much, but it shows enough to prove that the Cisco Police Department has no regard for the rights of citizens to record them.

The Cisco Police Department released a statement justifying the arrests:

> One of the officers noticed several of the persons on scene were recording events on cell phones and felt compelled to take the phones because he believed that they may contain evidence of interference with public duties of a police officer and resisting arrest.

But if they were so concerned about evidence, the cop would not have ordered the man to delete the footage in the first place.

However, logic has never been a necessary component in the Police PR Spin Machine.

According to the local new site, [__Big Country:__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/-p5dOv5-BUSGiH1JmAHtfQ)

> Quintin Long was on scene while a person with a felony warrant was being arrested. He started to record the incident with his personal cell phone. As seen in the cell phone video, the police officer did not want him to do that.
> In cell phone video captured on scene, the officer says “either give me the phone or delete the video. it’s one of the two.”
> Although the officer did not have a search warrant, he continued to demand Quintin’s cell phone.
> Quintin refused to hand over the phone and the officer began threatening to arrest him. Captured in the cell phone video, the officer says, “You’ll give it to me or I’ll arrest you too.”
> According to the Cisco Police Department, the cell phone was believed to be evidence. They released this in a statement earlier today:
> “One of the officers noticed several of the persons on scene were recording events on cell phones and felt compelled to take the phones because he believed that they may contain evidence of interference with public duties of a police officer and resisting arrest.
> But evidence or not, an attorney Randy Wilson says it is against the law to take the phone without a search warrant.
> “In order to view the contains of a cell phone, they have to have probable cause and get a search warrant issued. The fact that a person is under arrest, or even just detained, does not give the police officer the right to go into the cell phone and look at things that are on the cell phone.”

In the video, a cop can be heard at :16 saying, “anybody who is recording, I’m going to need your cell phones as evidence.”

A cop then walks up to Long, telling him, “either give me the phone or delete the video.”

That prompted another person recording, described as a 14-year-old boy on the initial Facebook video, to say, ‘I’m not deleting any video and I’m not giving you the phone.”

And that prompted the cop, whose name is apparently Turner, to storm up to him.

“You give it me or I’ll arrest you too,” the cop told him before reaching out to snag the phone.

But during the struggle, it appears as if the phone ended up in the hands of a woman.

Eventually, several people were arrested in the incident that may have taken place this week, but it is not confirmed in the video or the news report.

The initial Facebook video, posted on [__Counter Current News__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/video.php?v=597128903765227), says it was recorded by Quintin Long. But the news report identifies Long as the 20-year-old man initially threatened for recording, not the 14-year-old boy who apparently recorded this video.

Call the Cisco Police Department at (254) 442-1770 or leave a comment on its [__Facebook page.__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/1455625334663417)

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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