LAPD Holds Pregnant Woman at Gunpoint in Case of Mistaken Identity

In another case of mistaken identity that could have turned deadly, Los Angeles police held a pregnant woman at gunpoint while ordering her out of her pickup truck, making her walk to the middle of street with her hands in the air and yelling at her to get down on her knees.

LAPD said they were in fear for their lives because the woman, who is due to give birth next week, was driving a truck matching the description of a truck driven by a murder suspect.

They said that because the woman’s truck had dark, tinted windows, they were unable to determine if it was being driven by the man they were seeking or if it just happened to be one of almost [__six million registered vehicles__](http://www.laalmanac.com/transport/tr02.htm) in Los Angeles County that were not connected to the suspect.

The incident, which took place Thursday, was captured on video from an [__NBC L.A.__](http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Police-Draw-Guns-Pregnant-Woman-Mistaken-Identity-Incident-321850412.html) news helicopter hovering overhead.

The video shows about a dozen cops training their guns on the woman as well as another female passenger who was also ordered out while they all remained behind their patrol cars in the name of “officer safety”

The video also shows both the driver side and passenger side windows either open or without tints, but we don’t see the initial stop, which may have shown the windows closed  – not that dark tints should excuse them for violating the woman’s rights like that.

However, they’ve already learned that they can shoot up a truck in a case of mistaken identity and not face charges.

After all, it was only in 2013 that LAPD cops shot up a truck driven by two women after claiming it matched the description of a truck being driven by a whistleblower cop turned cop killer named Chris Dorner.

Dorner had been driving a gray Nissan Titan. The women had been driving a blue Toyota Tacoma.

So naturally police began fearing for their lives, which is why they opened fire on the Tacoma, driven by a 47-year-old daughter, accompanied by her 71-year-old mother, both of them delivering newspapers in a residential neighborhood.

Margie Carranza and her mother, Emma Hernandez, ended up receiving a [__$4.2 million settlement.__ ](http://articles.latimes.com/2013/apr/23/local/la-me-dorner-settlement-20130424) The cops ended up on paid desk duty for a while before returning to the streets.

Moments after that shooting, a Torrance police officer shot up another pickup truck thinking it was Dorner’s truck, but [__that was also a different make and colo__](http://articles.latimes.com/2013/feb/09/local/la-me-torrance-shooting-20130210)r and driven by a man named David Perdue who looked nothing like Dorner. He ended up [__receiving a $1.8 million__](http://www.dailybreeze.com/general-news/20140724/torrance-to-pay-18-million-to-settle-surfer-david-perdues-lawsuit-in-mistaken-christopher-dorner-shooting)
settlement.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck determined the eight cops who left Carranza’s truck with more than 102 bullets violated department policy, but said he was not allowed to disclose what, if any, discipline they may receive because a state law protects cops’ personnel files from public eyes.

So with that type of job security, it is no wonder LAPD officers tend to shoot first and ask questions later.

LAPD have not released the name of the murder suspect they were seeking, who they say is also responsible for several burglaries in the area, nor the make and model of his truck, not that it would make a difference to them as we saw in the Dorner incidents.

The women, who also had two kids in the back seat of the truck, were released after police determined they were not the murder suspect. They are probably also eligible for a settlement.

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In another case of mistaken identity that could have turned deadly, Los Angeles police held a pregnant woman at gunpoint while ordering her out of her pickup truck, making her walk to the middle of street with her hands in the air and yelling at her to get down on her knees.

LAPD said they were in fear for their lives because the woman, who is due to give birth next week, was driving a truck matching the description of a truck driven by a murder suspect.

They said that because the woman’s truck had dark, tinted windows, they were unable to determine if it was being driven by the man they were seeking or if it just happened to be one of almost [__six million registered vehicles__](http://www.laalmanac.com/transport/tr02.htm) in Los Angeles County that were not connected to the suspect.

The incident, which took place Thursday, was captured on video from an [__NBC L.A.__](http://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/Police-Draw-Guns-Pregnant-Woman-Mistaken-Identity-Incident-321850412.html) news helicopter hovering overhead.

The video shows about a dozen cops training their guns on the woman as well as another female passenger who was also ordered out while they all remained behind their patrol cars in the name of “officer safety”

The video also shows both the driver side and passenger side windows either open or without tints, but we don’t see the initial stop, which may have shown the windows closed  – not that dark tints should excuse them for violating the woman’s rights like that.

However, they’ve already learned that they can shoot up a truck in a case of mistaken identity and not face charges.

After all, it was only in 2013 that LAPD cops shot up a truck driven by two women after claiming it matched the description of a truck being driven by a whistleblower cop turned cop killer named Chris Dorner.

Dorner had been driving a gray Nissan Titan. The women had been driving a blue Toyota Tacoma.

So naturally police began fearing for their lives, which is why they opened fire on the Tacoma, driven by a 47-year-old daughter, accompanied by her 71-year-old mother, both of them delivering newspapers in a residential neighborhood.

Margie Carranza and her mother, Emma Hernandez, ended up receiving a [__$4.2 million settlement.__ ](http://articles.latimes.com/2013/apr/23/local/la-me-dorner-settlement-20130424) The cops ended up on paid desk duty for a while before returning to the streets.

Moments after that shooting, a Torrance police officer shot up another pickup truck thinking it was Dorner’s truck, but [__that was also a different make and colo__](http://articles.latimes.com/2013/feb/09/local/la-me-torrance-shooting-20130210)r and driven by a man named David Perdue who looked nothing like Dorner. He ended up [__receiving a $1.8 million__](http://www.dailybreeze.com/general-news/20140724/torrance-to-pay-18-million-to-settle-surfer-david-perdues-lawsuit-in-mistaken-christopher-dorner-shooting)
settlement.

LAPD Chief Charlie Beck determined the eight cops who left Carranza’s truck with more than 102 bullets violated department policy, but said he was not allowed to disclose what, if any, discipline they may receive because a state law protects cops’ personnel files from public eyes.

So with that type of job security, it is no wonder LAPD officers tend to shoot first and ask questions later.

LAPD have not released the name of the murder suspect they were seeking, who they say is also responsible for several burglaries in the area, nor the make and model of his truck, not that it would make a difference to them as we saw in the Dorner incidents.

The women, who also had two kids in the back seat of the truck, were released after police determined they were not the murder suspect. They are probably also eligible for a settlement.

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Carlos Miller
Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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