PA State Trooper Snatches Phone From Man After Car Accident

It was 10:30 a.m. on a Saturday when Matthew Taylor swerved off the side of a rural road in Pennsylvania to avoid hitting a fox that had darted in front of his car last month.

The 29-year-old ended up crashing into a pole on September 9, striking his head on the steering wheel before vomiting all over himself.

With his head throbbing and his mind groggy, and his clothes caked in vomit, he stepped out of the car with his phone to take photos of the damage.

But then a Pennsylvania state trooper named Michael Borosh approached him, asking him where he had been coming from.

Taylor told him he had been driving from work.

Borosh told him to put the phone down, claiming it could be a weapon, even though it was not even pointed in the trooper’s direction.

“Put that down for now,” Borosh said.

“Uh, you can’t tell me to do that,” Taylor said. “I’m sorry.”

But the cop grabbed it from his hands and pushed Taylor back into his seat, telling him, “I’m taking it for my safety.”

Borosh placed the phone on Taylor’s car and ordered him to do some sobriety tests, which he passed.

But still not getting his phone back, Taylor informed police that he wanted to file a complaint against Borosh.

However, he was informed that if he decided to do that, then he will have to forego his right to be check out by paramedics.

It was either file a complaint or find out for sure the extent of his injuries.

But when he chose to file a complaint, he stepped off the ambulance and was quickly handcuffed.

And this time, the cop decided he was going to drive him to a hospital to draw some blood.

And once they did that, the same Trooper Borosh drove him back home, handing his phone back to him, telling him the results should be available soon.

But he has not seen any results and does not expect anything worse than maybe a “failure to control” vehicle citation.

However, no matter what they try to come after him for, he said he will use [**common law**](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_law) to fight it, which is is described as fighting a case with precedented case law rather than legislative statutes.

Plus, he is now more aware than ever when it comes to his rights, as you will see in [**his Youtube channel**](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7CbahOLjmY)**.**

It was 10:30 a.m. on a Saturday when Matthew Taylor swerved off the side of a rural road in Pennsylvania to avoid hitting a fox that had darted in front of his car last month.

The 29-year-old ended up crashing into a pole on September 9, striking his head on the steering wheel before vomiting all over himself.

With his head throbbing and his mind groggy, and his clothes caked in vomit, he stepped out of the car with his phone to take photos of the damage.

But then a Pennsylvania state trooper named Michael Borosh approached him, asking him where he had been coming from.

Taylor told him he had been driving from work.

Borosh told him to put the phone down, claiming it could be a weapon, even though it was not even pointed in the trooper’s direction.

“Put that down for now,” Borosh said.

“Uh, you can’t tell me to do that,” Taylor said. “I’m sorry.”

But the cop grabbed it from his hands and pushed Taylor back into his seat, telling him, “I’m taking it for my safety.”

Borosh placed the phone on Taylor’s car and ordered him to do some sobriety tests, which he passed.

But still not getting his phone back, Taylor informed police that he wanted to file a complaint against Borosh.

However, he was informed that if he decided to do that, then he will have to forego his right to be check out by paramedics.

It was either file a complaint or find out for sure the extent of his injuries.

But when he chose to file a complaint, he stepped off the ambulance and was quickly handcuffed.

And this time, the cop decided he was going to drive him to a hospital to draw some blood.

And once they did that, the same Trooper Borosh drove him back home, handing his phone back to him, telling him the results should be available soon.

But he has not seen any results and does not expect anything worse than maybe a “failure to control” vehicle citation.

However, no matter what they try to come after him for, he said he will use [**common law**](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_law) to fight it, which is is described as fighting a case with precedented case law rather than legislative statutes.

Plus, he is now more aware than ever when it comes to his rights, as you will see in [**his Youtube channel**](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i7CbahOLjmY)**.**

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles