Jail Guard Receives Probation for Throwing Scalding Water on Inmate

A Miami jail guard who threw a cup of scalding water on an inmate, leaving him with second-degree burns pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor battery today.

Charlise Daniels-Wadley, who agreed to resign from her position, received one year of probation and will be required to do 50 hours of community service.

The incident took place in 2012 after Daniels-Wadley got into an argument with inmate Joshua Wiggins, who was released from prison last month after serving two years for cocaine trafficking.

The Miami Herald reports that she accepted the plea deal with Wiggins’ “blessing,” who will probably agree to anything as long as he is not scalded anymore.

Miami-Dade prosecutors say that in August 2012 Daniels-Wadley got into “an exchange of insults” with inmate Joshua Wiggins, who was awaiting trial for cocaine trafficking. At one point, she threatened to spray him with mace. Several minutes later, according to corrections investigators, Daniels-Wadley returned, opened the food flap of Wiggins’ cell and threw in hot liquid from a cup.
The burns on his chest caused intense pain for hours. According to investigators, Wiggins “repeatedly begged for access to medical care and a telephone.”
It was not until 6:30 p.m. that night that Wiggins, 21, called his sister to report what had happened. “He spent the rest of the night crying for medical help,” investigators said.
He was taken to a clinic the next morning – pointing out to officers that Daniels-Wadley, 28, was the person who attacked him. A doctor diagnosed him as having suffered second-degree burns; another doctor consulted by prosecutors estimated the water could have been as hot as 140 degrees.

On a side note, back in 2007 when I was convicted of resisting arrest stemming from an arrest for taking photos of cops – even though I was acquitted of all the other charges – I was sentenced to a year probation and 100 hours of community service along with eight hours of anger management.

Same courthouse, same jailhouse and same prosecutor’s office but a different judge who had a much stricter approach to sentencing.

A Miami jail guard who threw a cup of scalding water on an inmate, leaving him with second-degree burns pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor battery today.

Charlise Daniels-Wadley, who agreed to resign from her position, received one year of probation and will be required to do 50 hours of community service.

The incident took place in 2012 after Daniels-Wadley got into an argument with inmate Joshua Wiggins, who was released from prison last month after serving two years for cocaine trafficking.

The Miami Herald reports that she accepted the plea deal with Wiggins’ “blessing,” who will probably agree to anything as long as he is not scalded anymore.

Miami-Dade prosecutors say that in August 2012 Daniels-Wadley got into “an exchange of insults” with inmate Joshua Wiggins, who was awaiting trial for cocaine trafficking. At one point, she threatened to spray him with mace. Several minutes later, according to corrections investigators, Daniels-Wadley returned, opened the food flap of Wiggins’ cell and threw in hot liquid from a cup.
The burns on his chest caused intense pain for hours. According to investigators, Wiggins “repeatedly begged for access to medical care and a telephone.”
It was not until 6:30 p.m. that night that Wiggins, 21, called his sister to report what had happened. “He spent the rest of the night crying for medical help,” investigators said.
He was taken to a clinic the next morning – pointing out to officers that Daniels-Wadley, 28, was the person who attacked him. A doctor diagnosed him as having suffered second-degree burns; another doctor consulted by prosecutors estimated the water could have been as hot as 140 degrees.

On a side note, back in 2007 when I was convicted of resisting arrest stemming from an arrest for taking photos of cops – even though I was acquitted of all the other charges – I was sentenced to a year probation and 100 hours of community service along with eight hours of anger management.

Same courthouse, same jailhouse and same prosecutor’s office but a different judge who had a much stricter approach to sentencing.

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles