Oakland Cops Drag Man Out of Own Home and Kill Him

Responding to a call about a possible intruder inside a home, Oakland police arrived and discovered no intruder.

But that did not stop them from dragging a man out from his bedroom and into the street, suffocating Hernan Jaramillo until he died, ignoring his repeated pleas of “I can’t breathe” and “They’re killing me.”

Watching her brother die, Ana Biocini regretted ever calling police in the first place.

The incident took place more than two years ago but police body cam footage was only released last month.

And only after the city of Oakland agreed to a [__$450,000 settlement__](http://arstechnica.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/jaramillosettlement.pdf) in response to a [__lawsuit filed by__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/biocini-sum-judge-motion.pdf) Jaramillo’s family.

His sister had called police on July 8, 2013 because she heard loud crashing sounds coming from her brother’s bedroom, giving her the impression that he was being attacked by intruders.

She invited them inside the home and pointed to her brother’s bedroom door.

They knocked and after repeated requests, Jaramillo eventually cracked it open, prompting them to grab his wrists, pull him out and handcuff him.

Police say they smelled alcohol on his breath, which they said justified them handcuffing him in his own home. Plus, they still were not sure if he was the intruder or not.

His sister testified that she was shocked, she was speechless.

The responding officers, Ira Anderson, Carlos Navarro and Steven Stout, tried to shove Jaramillo in the back of a patrol car, telling him he was not arrested, that they only wanted to investigate, but he was not volunteering to sit inside the car.

Before long, the cops were piling on top of Jaramillo on the ground besides the car, telling him to “relax” while he kept telling he was unable to breathe.

“They’re killing me right now,” he yelled, his face pressed into the ground, his hands cuffed behind him, a possible knee on his back.

“Sir, we’re not killing you,” one cop responds.

Jaramillo keeps yelling that they are killing him but the cops are only interested in finding out what drugs he has done that night.

“They’re killing me!” he keeps yelling.

“If you start to relax, we’ll start to relax,” one cop tells him. “It’s a give and take here.”

The cop then continues to inquire about his drug use that night.

But by then, it was too late. Jaramillo is no longer talking.

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Responding to a call about a possible intruder inside a home, Oakland police arrived and discovered no intruder.

But that did not stop them from dragging a man out from his bedroom and into the street, suffocating Hernan Jaramillo until he died, ignoring his repeated pleas of “I can’t breathe” and “They’re killing me.”

Watching her brother die, Ana Biocini regretted ever calling police in the first place.

The incident took place more than two years ago but police body cam footage was only released last month.

And only after the city of Oakland agreed to a [__$450,000 settlement__](http://arstechnica.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/jaramillosettlement.pdf) in response to a [__lawsuit filed by__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/biocini-sum-judge-motion.pdf) Jaramillo’s family.

His sister had called police on July 8, 2013 because she heard loud crashing sounds coming from her brother’s bedroom, giving her the impression that he was being attacked by intruders.

She invited them inside the home and pointed to her brother’s bedroom door.

They knocked and after repeated requests, Jaramillo eventually cracked it open, prompting them to grab his wrists, pull him out and handcuff him.

Police say they smelled alcohol on his breath, which they said justified them handcuffing him in his own home. Plus, they still were not sure if he was the intruder or not.

His sister testified that she was shocked, she was speechless.

The responding officers, Ira Anderson, Carlos Navarro and Steven Stout, tried to shove Jaramillo in the back of a patrol car, telling him he was not arrested, that they only wanted to investigate, but he was not volunteering to sit inside the car.

Before long, the cops were piling on top of Jaramillo on the ground besides the car, telling him to “relax” while he kept telling he was unable to breathe.

“They’re killing me right now,” he yelled, his face pressed into the ground, his hands cuffed behind him, a possible knee on his back.

“Sir, we’re not killing you,” one cop responds.

Jaramillo keeps yelling that they are killing him but the cops are only interested in finding out what drugs he has done that night.

“They’re killing me!” he keeps yelling.

“If you start to relax, we’ll start to relax,” one cop tells him. “It’s a give and take here.”

The cop then continues to inquire about his drug use that night.

- Advertisement -

But by then, it was too late. Jaramillo is no longer talking.

- Advertisement -

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Carlos Miller
Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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