NC Deputy Justified in Killing Man Asking for Search Warrant

A North Carolina grand jury chose not to indict a sheriff’s deputy [__who shot and killed a man__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/2015/11/north-carolina-deputies-shoot-and-kill-man-after-demanding-to-see-search-warrant/) after he demanded to see a warrant to search his home last year.

Harnett County sheriff’s deputies banged on John Livingston’s door last November, searching for an assault suspect who was not at the home.

Livingston demanded to see a search warrant, but the deputies had none, so Livingston shut the door in their face.

That prompted deputies to kick in the door where they dragged him out on his porch, placed him facedown, and began beating, tasering and pepper spraying him.

At one point during the torture, Livingston grabbed on to a deputy’s taser, which was when Harnett County sheriff’s deputy Nicholas Kehagias pulled out his gun and shot him three times.

Livingston’s roommate said Livingston was not fighting back, just trying to keep from being tortured.

But the 18-member grand jury, which met in secret Monday, apparently was led to  believe that the act of grabbing a taser to keep from being tased was a threat to the deputy, which was why they decided to not indict him.

According to the [__News Observer:__](http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/crime/article71215052.html)

> After the grand jury declined to indict Kehagias, Reives said: “I’m happy for Nick and his family that this portion is over. He’s a really good person who got put in a really difficult situation.”
> Reives added: “I know he is sorry for how things are.”
> The grand jury’s decision came after months of unease in Harnett County. Livingston’s friends and family have protested in front of the courthouse, telling anyone who would listen that Kehagias killed Livingston for no reason.
> They congregated on Facebook, sharing their worries and speculation. As the weeks and months passed without an arrest, they feared his death would go unanswered. They were skeptical that a grand jury would indict.
> “I don’t know how to go on,” Kathy Livingston, John Livingston’s mother, said Monday after learning of the grand jury’s decision. “That’s a failure to my son. There is no justice.”
> Bradley Timmerman, who was at John Livingston’s home and witnessed the shooting, said the 18 jurors asked him very few questions. He said they wanted to know if Livingston used any force on Kehagias that night.
> “It wasn’t too good of a crowd,” Timmerman said. “They looked at me like they couldn’t wait to be done.”

Kehagias, 26, has been on the force for less than three years. He has been on paid administrative leave since the November 15, 2015 shooting.

But now that he has been cleared of charges, he is expected to go back on duty.

A North Carolina grand jury chose not to indict a sheriff’s deputy [__who shot and killed a man__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/2015/11/north-carolina-deputies-shoot-and-kill-man-after-demanding-to-see-search-warrant/) after he demanded to see a warrant to search his home last year.

Harnett County sheriff’s deputies banged on John Livingston’s door last November, searching for an assault suspect who was not at the home.

Livingston demanded to see a search warrant, but the deputies had none, so Livingston shut the door in their face.

That prompted deputies to kick in the door where they dragged him out on his porch, placed him facedown, and began beating, tasering and pepper spraying him.

At one point during the torture, Livingston grabbed on to a deputy’s taser, which was when Harnett County sheriff’s deputy Nicholas Kehagias pulled out his gun and shot him three times.

Livingston’s roommate said Livingston was not fighting back, just trying to keep from being tortured.

But the 18-member grand jury, which met in secret Monday, apparently was led to  believe that the act of grabbing a taser to keep from being tased was a threat to the deputy, which was why they decided to not indict him.

According to the [__News Observer:__](http://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/crime/article71215052.html)

> After the grand jury declined to indict Kehagias, Reives said: “I’m happy for Nick and his family that this portion is over. He’s a really good person who got put in a really difficult situation.”
> Reives added: “I know he is sorry for how things are.”
> The grand jury’s decision came after months of unease in Harnett County. Livingston’s friends and family have protested in front of the courthouse, telling anyone who would listen that Kehagias killed Livingston for no reason.
> They congregated on Facebook, sharing their worries and speculation. As the weeks and months passed without an arrest, they feared his death would go unanswered. They were skeptical that a grand jury would indict.
> “I don’t know how to go on,” Kathy Livingston, John Livingston’s mother, said Monday after learning of the grand jury’s decision. “That’s a failure to my son. There is no justice.”
> Bradley Timmerman, who was at John Livingston’s home and witnessed the shooting, said the 18 jurors asked him very few questions. He said they wanted to know if Livingston used any force on Kehagias that night.
> “It wasn’t too good of a crowd,” Timmerman said. “They looked at me like they couldn’t wait to be done.”

Kehagias, 26, has been on the force for less than three years. He has been on paid administrative leave since the November 15, 2015 shooting.

But now that he has been cleared of charges, he is expected to go back on duty.

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles