Texas Deputy Handcuffs Jogging Teen, Falsely Accusing him

Ordering him down on the ground while threatening to taser him, handcuffing him when the teen refused to say where he attended school.

The teen began recording the encounter but the video turned off after five minutes when the deputy cuffed him.

The Harris County sheriff’s deputy said the teen matched a description of a person who had just robbed a nearby Walgreens, but the deputy did not even appear very sure of the suspect’s description when he radioed dispatch to inquire about a description.

The dispatcher only told him the suspect was wearing a blue sweatshirt and black pants, offering no other details like age, sex, race, height or build.

The teen, who said he was wearing a black hoodie with blue “M” logo and blue shorts, who uploaded the video to his YouTube channel on December 16, stating the following:

> Just doing my daily jog after school then this old geezer begins to follow me but does not honk at first. So I started recording for my safety. After he handcuffed me and stopped the video from recording he put me inside his vehicle and made me answer all his question, what’s your name, where do you live, what school you go to. Then on his radio they add another description that the suspect was wearing a blue sweat shirt and black pants….I had on a black hoodie with blue shorts……

The teen did not say when the incident took place, but we have reached out and will update this story when he obtain that information.

The video begins with the deputy pulling alongside the teen, demanding to know, “what are you running for?”

“I’m jogging,” the teen responds.

When the deputy continues to badger him with questions, the teen insists on knowing why he was being stopped.

“Well, we just had a robbery down there and you kind of match the description,” the deputy responds.

The deputy then asks for the teen’s name, which he first declines to give, but then tells him, “my name is Andrew.”

“Have a seat on the ground or I’m going to light your ass up,” the deputy responds.

“You’re not complying. No ID, investigating a robbery, you’re running from that area.”

“I’m just jogging,” the teen responds.

The deputy then tells him it’s against the law not to carry identification, which is false.

When the teen tells the deputy he is 17, the deputy responds by saying, “Seventeen is an adult.”

But in Texas, a [__17-year-old must petition the courts__](http://statelaws.findlaw.com/texas-law/texas-legal-ages-laws.html) to be considered an adult, otherwise, he would still be considered a minor.

Also, [__Texas law__](https://excoplawstudent.wordpress.com/2013/05/09/texas-failure-to-identify-law-what-it-says-vs-what-police-think-it-says/) only makes it a crime not to identify yourself if you are being lawfully arrested. There is no legal requirement that one must always carry an identification, especially if they are not driving.

That was when the deputy called into dispatch to inquire about the suspect’s description.

“He should be wearing a blue sweatshirt,” the dispatcher responds.

“Do I have a blue sweatshirt on?” the teen asks. “No, thank you. I do not.”

“He’s got a blue sweatshirt on,” the deputy replies to the dispatcher.

“It’s a black …,” the teen asserts.

The teen then asks the deputy’s name and it sounds as if he says, “deputy Clark.”

The deputy then asked the teen where he went to school, which the teen refused to answer, leading to the deputy to pull out his handcuffs.

The teen then said he went to “Davis,” which apparently is [__Davis High School,__](http://davishs.aldineisd.org/)which is in the north part of Houston.

But by then, it was too late. The deputy moved in to handcuff him, telling him he was “being uncooperative.”

It then appears as if he takes the phone and stops it from recording because the video cuts out.

The teen does not say how long he was detained for, but we will update that information when he responds to our inquiries.

Ordering him down on the ground while threatening to taser him, handcuffing him when the teen refused to say where he attended school.

The teen began recording the encounter but the video turned off after five minutes when the deputy cuffed him.

The Harris County sheriff’s deputy said the teen matched a description of a person who had just robbed a nearby Walgreens, but the deputy did not even appear very sure of the suspect’s description when he radioed dispatch to inquire about a description.

The dispatcher only told him the suspect was wearing a blue sweatshirt and black pants, offering no other details like age, sex, race, height or build.

The teen, who said he was wearing a black hoodie with blue “M” logo and blue shorts, who uploaded the video to his YouTube channel on December 16, stating the following:

> Just doing my daily jog after school then this old geezer begins to follow me but does not honk at first. So I started recording for my safety. After he handcuffed me and stopped the video from recording he put me inside his vehicle and made me answer all his question, what’s your name, where do you live, what school you go to. Then on his radio they add another description that the suspect was wearing a blue sweat shirt and black pants….I had on a black hoodie with blue shorts……

The teen did not say when the incident took place, but we have reached out and will update this story when he obtain that information.

The video begins with the deputy pulling alongside the teen, demanding to know, “what are you running for?”

“I’m jogging,” the teen responds.

When the deputy continues to badger him with questions, the teen insists on knowing why he was being stopped.

“Well, we just had a robbery down there and you kind of match the description,” the deputy responds.

The deputy then asks for the teen’s name, which he first declines to give, but then tells him, “my name is Andrew.”

“Have a seat on the ground or I’m going to light your ass up,” the deputy responds.

“You’re not complying. No ID, investigating a robbery, you’re running from that area.”

“I’m just jogging,” the teen responds.

The deputy then tells him it’s against the law not to carry identification, which is false.

When the teen tells the deputy he is 17, the deputy responds by saying, “Seventeen is an adult.”

But in Texas, a [__17-year-old must petition the courts__](http://statelaws.findlaw.com/texas-law/texas-legal-ages-laws.html) to be considered an adult, otherwise, he would still be considered a minor.

Also, [__Texas law__](https://excoplawstudent.wordpress.com/2013/05/09/texas-failure-to-identify-law-what-it-says-vs-what-police-think-it-says/) only makes it a crime not to identify yourself if you are being lawfully arrested. There is no legal requirement that one must always carry an identification, especially if they are not driving.

That was when the deputy called into dispatch to inquire about the suspect’s description.

“He should be wearing a blue sweatshirt,” the dispatcher responds.

“Do I have a blue sweatshirt on?” the teen asks. “No, thank you. I do not.”

“He’s got a blue sweatshirt on,” the deputy replies to the dispatcher.

“It’s a black …,” the teen asserts.

The teen then asks the deputy’s name and it sounds as if he says, “deputy Clark.”

The deputy then asked the teen where he went to school, which the teen refused to answer, leading to the deputy to pull out his handcuffs.

The teen then said he went to “Davis,” which apparently is [__Davis High School,__](http://davishs.aldineisd.org/)which is in the north part of Houston.

But by then, it was too late. The deputy moved in to handcuff him, telling him he was “being uncooperative.”

It then appears as if he takes the phone and stops it from recording because the video cuts out.

The teen does not say how long he was detained for, but we will update that information when he responds to our inquiries.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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