Off-Duty Cop Threatens Man with Gun, Falsely Accusing him of Shoplifting Candy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W316slPMVQE

A Southern California cop who was not even on-duty or in uniform tried to be a hero by pulling out his gun on a man inside a convenience store, accusing him of stealing a $1.19 roll of mints.

But it turns out, the man had paid for the candy.

The Buena Park police officer then apologized, but only after the store clerk confirmed the man had made the purchase as can be seen on the security camera video.

But the man, Jose Arreola, is still shaken up by the incident, according to the Orange County Register.

“It’s been a month and I still can’t shake it,” Arreola said. “It was traumatic, the whole incident. (And) I grew up in Santa Ana. I’ve been shot at before.”

Buena Park Sgt. Mike Lovchik declined to comment on the incident, saying an internal investigation is underway.

Police shootings have become a hot-button issue in cities across the United States, where 370 people have been shot and killed by officers so far this year, according to a database compiled by the Washington Post. The data show that the slain are typically armed.

The shootings have amplified the question, when is it appropriate for a police officer to draw a gun?

Joe Domanick, associate director of the Center on Media, Crime and Justice at John Jay College, said the Buena Park officer was “way out of policy, even for Orange County.”

“It’s astounding there would be a police officer who would think it’s OK to do it,” said Domanick, author of the book “Blue: The LAPD and the Battle to Redeem American Policing.” “(It’s) entirely opposite of what’s going on in police departments. You pull a gun as a last resort.”

He continued: “It shows the officer has been poorly trained or not trained at all or he’s totally unsuited to be a police officer.”

Buena Park police have not released the cop’s name, but the department’s police chief, Corey Sianez, posted on Facebook that he “found the video to be disturbing,” but we will not comment further until the investigation is over.

But it’s been a month and there isn’t much to investigate other than the cop screwed up by wrongly assuming the man was a thief.

Also, even if the man had shoplifted the candy, does he need to be threatened at gunpoint by an off-duty cop?

Of course not only doees Sianez knows this, but he is doing all he can to protect the officer, who should have been fired by now.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W316slPMVQE

A Southern California cop who was not even on-duty or in uniform tried to be a hero by pulling out his gun on a man inside a convenience store, accusing him of stealing a $1.19 roll of mints.

But it turns out, the man had paid for the candy.

The Buena Park police officer then apologized, but only after the store clerk confirmed the man had made the purchase as can be seen on the security camera video.

But the man, Jose Arreola, is still shaken up by the incident, according to the Orange County Register.

“It’s been a month and I still can’t shake it,” Arreola said. “It was traumatic, the whole incident. (And) I grew up in Santa Ana. I’ve been shot at before.”

Buena Park Sgt. Mike Lovchik declined to comment on the incident, saying an internal investigation is underway.

Police shootings have become a hot-button issue in cities across the United States, where 370 people have been shot and killed by officers so far this year, according to a database compiled by the Washington Post. The data show that the slain are typically armed.

The shootings have amplified the question, when is it appropriate for a police officer to draw a gun?

Joe Domanick, associate director of the Center on Media, Crime and Justice at John Jay College, said the Buena Park officer was “way out of policy, even for Orange County.”

“It’s astounding there would be a police officer who would think it’s OK to do it,” said Domanick, author of the book “Blue: The LAPD and the Battle to Redeem American Policing.” “(It’s) entirely opposite of what’s going on in police departments. You pull a gun as a last resort.”

He continued: “It shows the officer has been poorly trained or not trained at all or he’s totally unsuited to be a police officer.”

Buena Park police have not released the cop’s name, but the department’s police chief, Corey Sianez, posted on Facebook that he “found the video to be disturbing,” but we will not comment further until the investigation is over.

But it’s been a month and there isn’t much to investigate other than the cop screwed up by wrongly assuming the man was a thief.

Also, even if the man had shoplifted the candy, does he need to be threatened at gunpoint by an off-duty cop?

Of course not only doees Sianez knows this, but he is doing all he can to protect the officer, who should have been fired by now.

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles