Video shows Arizona Cop Punch, Drag Woman during Traffic Stop

A police department in Arizona released body cam footage of the arrest of a woman stopped for driving without a license.

She was then punched in the face and dragged on the asphalt after an officer accused her of resisting arrest.

The woman’s crime: asking why she was under arrest and driving with a suspicious passenger.

It turns out, her driver’s license was revoked.

Body cam footage from September 6 shows Goodyear police officer only identified M. Ross asking Renee Armenta if her name is Renee.

“Yes,” she replies before Ross orders her out of the car because she is under arrest.

But she doesn’t know why she’s under arrest and sits back into the seat of her car.

That’s when officer Ross grabs her by the wrists and drags her on the ground before forcing her into his patrol car.

A male passenger then exits the vehicle protesting Ross’s treatment of Armenta.

Ross pulls his gun and aims it at the passenger identified as John Moreno ordering him to drop to the ground.

Moreno complies.

Police back up arrive and Ross can be heard telling fellow officers he punched her because she put her hands behind her back as he tried to arrest her, which caused him fear.

In the video, Armenta continues asking why she was under arrest.

“I didn’t do anything, sir, why did you punch me?” she asks.

Ross can then be heard telling a group of officers he found Armenta’s passenger suspicious, which is why he ran her plates.

Moreno was arrested for drug paraphernalia, according to AzCentral.

Armenta was transported to the hospital for treatment.

“He punched me, he pulled me, he dragged me — I was just scared,” Armenta recalled after the incident.

“He pulled his gun. I was terrified. I was scared. I didn’t know what was going on.”

Armenta’s attorney, Anothony Ramirez, said during a September 11 press conference that he found the video disturbing and was considering the idea of filing a civil rights lawsuit for his client.

The Goodyear police department has not responded to repeated media requests regarding the officer’s full name.

- Advertisement -

A police department in Arizona released body cam footage of the arrest of a woman stopped for driving without a license.

She was then punched in the face and dragged on the asphalt after an officer accused her of resisting arrest.

The woman’s crime: asking why she was under arrest and driving with a suspicious passenger.

It turns out, her driver’s license was revoked.

Body cam footage from September 6 shows Goodyear police officer only identified M. Ross asking Renee Armenta if her name is Renee.

“Yes,” she replies before Ross orders her out of the car because she is under arrest.

But she doesn’t know why she’s under arrest and sits back into the seat of her car.

That’s when officer Ross grabs her by the wrists and drags her on the ground before forcing her into his patrol car.

A male passenger then exits the vehicle protesting Ross’s treatment of Armenta.

Ross pulls his gun and aims it at the passenger identified as John Moreno ordering him to drop to the ground.

Moreno complies.

Police back up arrive and Ross can be heard telling fellow officers he punched her because she put her hands behind her back as he tried to arrest her, which caused him fear.

In the video, Armenta continues asking why she was under arrest.

“I didn’t do anything, sir, why did you punch me?” she asks.

Ross can then be heard telling a group of officers he found Armenta’s passenger suspicious, which is why he ran her plates.

Moreno was arrested for drug paraphernalia, according to AzCentral.

- Advertisement -

Armenta was transported to the hospital for treatment.

“He punched me, he pulled me, he dragged me — I was just scared,” Armenta recalled after the incident.

“He pulled his gun. I was terrified. I was scared. I didn’t know what was going on.”

Armenta’s attorney, Anothony Ramirez, said during a September 11 press conference that he found the video disturbing and was considering the idea of filing a civil rights lawsuit for his client.

The Goodyear police department has not responded to repeated media requests regarding the officer’s full name.

- Advertisement -

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles