Florida County Plans on Charging Inmates for their Meals

Starting October 1, inmates will be required to pay $2.70 a day for their meals, as approved in a recent commission meeting.

The reason behind the change is being spearheaded by Jackson County jail administrator Mark Foreman, who wants the revenue to be used for $150-per-month hazard pay he wants to offer all the employees at the correctional facility.

The facility currently employs around 50 different positions. Foreman believes that if only half of the inmates paid they could see an increase of $98,800 annually.

The way he plans on getting the money is through what he calls a “daily subsistence fee,” where he believes he can legally access the accounts that inmates have created for people to give money to the inmates while they are incarcerated.

The board approved it as a pilot program after initially tabling the notion advising Foremen to check with court officials to get their input.

If the program does not go as planned it has been advised that they will pull the program after reviewing it after it has been in place for 120 days.

After inmates family friends and family raised concerns, interim jail chief Capt. Jammie Jeter advised of how the implementation of the plan will go.

Jeter advised that no inmate will be denied food if their account doesnt have money to cover the fee. Instead, the inmate will build up a debt that will last three years on their books and any money given to the inmate will go towards the debt. Many feared that the three years of debt would prolong the release of inmates but Jeter stated that it will not affect release dates but if the inmate is arrested again within the three years, the debt will still be there.

Currently, there is a policy that withholds 60 percent of the funds in inmates accounts to cover debts that incur while in jail such as booking fees and other expenses. Jeter stated that the meal fee will be withdrawn from that 60 percent and not the other 40 percent that inmates can use as they please. If there is any money left over from the 60 percent that was withheld when inmates are released they are to receive it back.

Since it is manditory to provide the food to inmates, they will still be charged if they choose not to eat.

If an inmate is in jail for less than 24-hours the new policy will not affect them.

- Advertisement -

Starting October 1, inmates will be required to pay $2.70 a day for their meals, as approved in a recent commission meeting.

The reason behind the change is being spearheaded by Jackson County jail administrator Mark Foreman, who wants the revenue to be used for $150-per-month hazard pay he wants to offer all the employees at the correctional facility.

The facility currently employs around 50 different positions. Foreman believes that if only half of the inmates paid they could see an increase of $98,800 annually.

The way he plans on getting the money is through what he calls a “daily subsistence fee,” where he believes he can legally access the accounts that inmates have created for people to give money to the inmates while they are incarcerated.

The board approved it as a pilot program after initially tabling the notion advising Foremen to check with court officials to get their input.

If the program does not go as planned it has been advised that they will pull the program after reviewing it after it has been in place for 120 days.

After inmates family friends and family raised concerns, interim jail chief Capt. Jammie Jeter advised of how the implementation of the plan will go.

Jeter advised that no inmate will be denied food if their account doesnt have money to cover the fee. Instead, the inmate will build up a debt that will last three years on their books and any money given to the inmate will go towards the debt. Many feared that the three years of debt would prolong the release of inmates but Jeter stated that it will not affect release dates but if the inmate is arrested again within the three years, the debt will still be there.

Currently, there is a policy that withholds 60 percent of the funds in inmates accounts to cover debts that incur while in jail such as booking fees and other expenses. Jeter stated that the meal fee will be withdrawn from that 60 percent and not the other 40 percent that inmates can use as they please. If there is any money left over from the 60 percent that was withheld when inmates are released they are to receive it back.

Since it is manditory to provide the food to inmates, they will still be charged if they choose not to eat.

If an inmate is in jail for less than 24-hours the new policy will not affect them.

- Advertisement -

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles