Florida Man Sues Cops who Tasered, Arrested him for “Shopping while Black”

A Florida cop walked into a 7-11 convenience store last year and ordered a man standing at the counter to walk outside, claiming he had received “a call” about him.

The man, Holley Denton Jones, was skeptical and began asking for details, but Fort Myers police officer Christopher Robles insisted he must step outside.

Jones refused to step outside, offering to shake the cop’s hand instead.

But Robles manipulated the situation to claim Jones was trying to assault him.

“Don’t touch me!” Robles kept repeating in his mock tough-guy voice, a whiny punk empowered by a badge and a gun.

“Ok, I won’t touch you,” responded Jones, walking away from him.

“I’m going to tell you right now, don’t touch me,” Robles continued.

“You need to step out of this store right now. Don’t touch me. Don’t put your hands on me.”

Fort Myers police officer James Barlow walked into the store, continuing the charade of ordering Jones out of the store.

When Robles asked the clerk is she wanted him out, she said no.

“He ain’t doing nothing wrong,” she said.

But Robles continued whining about being touched, even though it does not even appear he was touched. And if he was, it was only an attempt at a handshake.

It was obvious he was trying to convince witnesses he had been assaulted, similar to how cops yell “stop resisting” to non-resisting suspects they are beating.

Once outside, both cops tried to get Jones to stand in front of a patrol car where they planned to frisk him, but Jones became frightened and walked back into the store.

That was when they tasered him.

The incident took place on April 15, 2018. Jones filed a lawsuit Tuesday, which can be read here.

According to the News-Press:

The lawsuit, filed in federal court in Fort Myers, alleges that the two officers used the Taser on Jones inside the convenience store despite receiving no complaints that he was acting unlawfully or creating a disturbance.

After Jones was stunned, he was arrested and charged with disturbing the peace, resisting an officer without violence, heroin possession, and marijuana possession.

All of the charges were eventually dropped.

At a press conference Tuesday morning, Michigan-based attorney Solomon Radner, representing Jones, said all his client was guilty of was shopping while being black.

Read the arrest report here and notice how they describe Jones as being “agitated” to justify their arrest when they were the ones agitating him.

They also claimed they were responding to a call about a disruptive, intoxicated man, but Jones did not appear drunk or disorderly when first approached.

But Robles was on a power trip, so it didn’t matter. Another ticking time bomb we’ll be reading more about in the future.

“You came at me in a pretty violent manner,” Robles blatantly lied as he was placing Jones into the back of the police car.​

A Florida cop walked into a 7-11 convenience store last year and ordered a man standing at the counter to walk outside, claiming he had received “a call” about him.

The man, Holley Denton Jones, was skeptical and began asking for details, but Fort Myers police officer Christopher Robles insisted he must step outside.

Jones refused to step outside, offering to shake the cop’s hand instead.

But Robles manipulated the situation to claim Jones was trying to assault him.

“Don’t touch me!” Robles kept repeating in his mock tough-guy voice, a whiny punk empowered by a badge and a gun.

“Ok, I won’t touch you,” responded Jones, walking away from him.

“I’m going to tell you right now, don’t touch me,” Robles continued.

“You need to step out of this store right now. Don’t touch me. Don’t put your hands on me.”

Fort Myers police officer James Barlow walked into the store, continuing the charade of ordering Jones out of the store.

When Robles asked the clerk is she wanted him out, she said no.

“He ain’t doing nothing wrong,” she said.

But Robles continued whining about being touched, even though it does not even appear he was touched. And if he was, it was only an attempt at a handshake.

It was obvious he was trying to convince witnesses he had been assaulted, similar to how cops yell “stop resisting” to non-resisting suspects they are beating.

Once outside, both cops tried to get Jones to stand in front of a patrol car where they planned to frisk him, but Jones became frightened and walked back into the store.

That was when they tasered him.

The incident took place on April 15, 2018. Jones filed a lawsuit Tuesday, which can be read here.

According to the News-Press:

The lawsuit, filed in federal court in Fort Myers, alleges that the two officers used the Taser on Jones inside the convenience store despite receiving no complaints that he was acting unlawfully or creating a disturbance.

After Jones was stunned, he was arrested and charged with disturbing the peace, resisting an officer without violence, heroin possession, and marijuana possession.

All of the charges were eventually dropped.

At a press conference Tuesday morning, Michigan-based attorney Solomon Radner, representing Jones, said all his client was guilty of was shopping while being black.

Read the arrest report here and notice how they describe Jones as being “agitated” to justify their arrest when they were the ones agitating him.

They also claimed they were responding to a call about a disruptive, intoxicated man, but Jones did not appear drunk or disorderly when first approached.

But Robles was on a power trip, so it didn’t matter. Another ticking time bomb we’ll be reading more about in the future.

“You came at me in a pretty violent manner,” Robles blatantly lied as he was placing Jones into the back of the police car.​

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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