Massachusetts Cop Charged with Raping Teen Addict he was supposed to Help

The Massachusetts cop was in his 40s when he confronted a homeless 16-year-old girl living in a tent, falsely telling her she had multiple warrants for her arrest.

Lowell police officer Kevin Garneau then told her he could make them go away in exchange for sex.

He then forced himself on her and raped her, the girl later told authorities.

When he was done, he tossed her some cash and told her to get help for her addiction, returning to the tent at least two more times to rape her over the next two months, she told investigators.

Garneau, 49, was indicted this week on two counts of rape and is facing up to 20 years in prison for each count, according to the Lowell Sun.

The alleged rapes began in 2016 upon the creation of an ambitious new program called the Community Opioid Outreach Program where Garneau was handed the task of visiting homeless people in tents in search of opioid addicts to help find them treatment.

Garneau was already a popular cop in the community at the time, known for his bike patrols, even during freezing temperatures. He was also an award-winner (along with what appears to be the entire department).

Police said they became aware of the allegations in January and placed Garneau on paid administrative leave. Now that he has been charged, he has been placed on unpaid suspension.

Garneau, who pleaded not guilty, denies all the allegations. He was released without bail after his arraignment Thursday on the condition he wear a GPS tracker.

The Massachusetts cop was in his 40s when he confronted a homeless 16-year-old girl living in a tent, falsely telling her she had multiple warrants for her arrest.

Lowell police officer Kevin Garneau then told her he could make them go away in exchange for sex.

He then forced himself on her and raped her, the girl later told authorities.

When he was done, he tossed her some cash and told her to get help for her addiction, returning to the tent at least two more times to rape her over the next two months, she told investigators.

Garneau, 49, was indicted this week on two counts of rape and is facing up to 20 years in prison for each count, according to the Lowell Sun.

The alleged rapes began in 2016 upon the creation of an ambitious new program called the Community Opioid Outreach Program where Garneau was handed the task of visiting homeless people in tents in search of opioid addicts to help find them treatment.

Garneau was already a popular cop in the community at the time, known for his bike patrols, even during freezing temperatures. He was also an award-winner (along with what appears to be the entire department).

Police said they became aware of the allegations in January and placed Garneau on paid administrative leave. Now that he has been charged, he has been placed on unpaid suspension.

Garneau, who pleaded not guilty, denies all the allegations. He was released without bail after his arraignment Thursday on the condition he wear a GPS tracker.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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