Woman Dropped on Face by Cop Files Lawsuit, Claiming she Suffered Brain Damage

The Arizona cop suspected the woman of trying to break into her ex-husband’s car when he dropped her on her face, leaving her with a traumatic brain injury.

But Samantha Glass said she was only trying to get inside her ex-husband’s car to wait for him after he had stormed off with their daughter following an argument earlier in the evening.

When the 36-year-old woman was unable to get inside the car, she walked to her ex-husband’s apartment and sat in front of his door waiting for him.

That was when Gilbert police officer Christopher Robinson walked up and began questioning her, telling her they received calls from neighbors saying she was trying to break into the car.

Glass was drunk and it shows and Robinson quickly lost patience with her and told her, “I”m about to grab hold of you and place you in handcuffs.”

It was only then she tried to walk away from him which was when he grabbed her by her wrist and dropped her on her face, leaving her in a pool of blood.

Last week, Glass filed a lawsuit against Robinson and the police department, accusing the cop of using “unreasonable and unnecessary force.”

The incident took place in March 2018, according to court records.

According to the Phoenix New Times:

Glass was drunk, by all accounts. The two met in the parking lot, and an argument ensued. Her ex-husband walked away, taking their daughter with him to a nearby park.

In Glass’ version of the incident, documents show, she decided to sit in his car and wait for him, but it was locked. The alarm went off. She instead took the stairs to his apartment and sat down outside the door, intending to speak to him when he returned.

But other residents had seen her in the parking lot and believed she was trying to break into her ex-husband’s vehicle. They called 911, which brought Officer Robinson to her ex-husband’s apartment door.

The complaint states that Robinson used unreasonable, unnecessary, and excessive force against Glass while detaining her.

“Police officers are responsible for taking care and not harming people,” Halverson said. “If a person is intoxicated, officers clearly know that their balance and their judgment is impaired. And instead of maybe walking behind her and following her down the stairs, he forces her down in that intoxicated state and forces her down on the concrete. That was excessive force.”

Although police initially charged her with burglary, she ended up convicted of interfering with a police officer and extreme DUI, both misdemeanors.

Watch the shortened video above or the full video below.

The Arizona cop suspected the woman of trying to break into her ex-husband’s car when he dropped her on her face, leaving her with a traumatic brain injury.

But Samantha Glass said she was only trying to get inside her ex-husband’s car to wait for him after he had stormed off with their daughter following an argument earlier in the evening.

When the 36-year-old woman was unable to get inside the car, she walked to her ex-husband’s apartment and sat in front of his door waiting for him.

That was when Gilbert police officer Christopher Robinson walked up and began questioning her, telling her they received calls from neighbors saying she was trying to break into the car.

Glass was drunk and it shows and Robinson quickly lost patience with her and told her, “I”m about to grab hold of you and place you in handcuffs.”

It was only then she tried to walk away from him which was when he grabbed her by her wrist and dropped her on her face, leaving her in a pool of blood.

Last week, Glass filed a lawsuit against Robinson and the police department, accusing the cop of using “unreasonable and unnecessary force.”

The incident took place in March 2018, according to court records.

According to the Phoenix New Times:

Glass was drunk, by all accounts. The two met in the parking lot, and an argument ensued. Her ex-husband walked away, taking their daughter with him to a nearby park.

In Glass’ version of the incident, documents show, she decided to sit in his car and wait for him, but it was locked. The alarm went off. She instead took the stairs to his apartment and sat down outside the door, intending to speak to him when he returned.

But other residents had seen her in the parking lot and believed she was trying to break into her ex-husband’s vehicle. They called 911, which brought Officer Robinson to her ex-husband’s apartment door.

The complaint states that Robinson used unreasonable, unnecessary, and excessive force against Glass while detaining her.

“Police officers are responsible for taking care and not harming people,” Halverson said. “If a person is intoxicated, officers clearly know that their balance and their judgment is impaired. And instead of maybe walking behind her and following her down the stairs, he forces her down in that intoxicated state and forces her down on the concrete. That was excessive force.”

Although police initially charged her with burglary, she ended up convicted of interfering with a police officer and extreme DUI, both misdemeanors.

Watch the shortened video above or the full video below.

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles