Miami Cops Assault and Arrest Man for Recording them from Public Sidewalk

The Miami cops knew the routine, shoving and pushing a man who was recording them before assaulting and arresting him for “putting the camera in my face” as one said.

But the video shows they were the ones in his face. One cop even admits it.

“Why are you in my face,” Emanual David Williams asks as he is recording early Sunday morning in the Overtown neighborhood of Miami.

“Because we can be,” a cop named Allen responds, one of two cops initially confronting David.

A third cop named Gonzalez then swaggers up and gets in David’s face while a cop named Hernandez orders him to cross the street which he complies.

But once he was standing on the sidewalk on the other side of the street, the cop named Hernandez walks up to him and knocks the phone out of his hand.

“Do not put the phone in my face!” Hernandez yells.

The phone lands on the sidewalk and continues recording while pointing skyward showing the cops grabbing him and forcing him to the ground, ordering to “stop resisting” as they are trained to do when beating non-resisting suspects.

“I’m not resisting!” David yells several times

The cops charged him with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest, which are the typical contempt of cop charges Florida cops like to fabricate when arresting people for recording them (it happened to me in 2007 in almost the same manner which is what led to the creation of this site).

The Miami New Times obtained the police report.

According to an arrest report obtained by New Times, the three officers arrived on the scene after Williams’ ex-girlfriend asked for assistance with removing some items from their home. The cops do not state in their arrest documents that Williams acted violently toward them — instead, an officer listed as W. Gonzalez stated he arrested Williams simply for getting too close to him with his cell phone.

“The defendant then continued to place his cellphone within very close proximity of my face, once again breaching the distance within my reactionary gap, at which point I advised the defendant that he was under arrest, at which point I grabbed the defendant by the arm and attempted to directed [sic] him to the ground to effect the arrest,” Gonzalez wrote. The officer further alleged that Williams continued to tense his body and that he entered a police vehicle only “after another struggle.”

Reached by phone, Williams tells New Times that when he arrived on the scene, the officers prevented him from entering his apartment without explaining why. After the officers told him to move across the street, he was confused why the trio then followed him to the other side, he says. Once the cops swatted his phone away, he was stunned that his phone wound up catching more of the incident by accident.

“I was shocked my phone even picked up the part after they knocked it out of my hand,” he says. “I only got my phone back after I got out of jail. I didn’t think my phone caught all that.”

If everything went down as reported, then the cops had no legal reason to force Williams across the street because he was not interfering with whatever it was they were doing with his ex-girlfriend.

“I’m more than 50 feet away from her,” Williams tells the cops as one tells him “you better stay back.”

But the video shows he expressed no intention of getting any closer. He was content just standing on the sidewalk recording, which is what got him arrested.

The videos were posted to Williams’ Instagram account. All three cops were wearing body cameras. No word yet on whether those bodycam videos will be released anytime soon. Or if they will somehow disappear.

The Miami cops knew the routine, shoving and pushing a man who was recording them before assaulting and arresting him for “putting the camera in my face” as one said.

But the video shows they were the ones in his face. One cop even admits it.

“Why are you in my face,” Emanual David Williams asks as he is recording early Sunday morning in the Overtown neighborhood of Miami.

“Because we can be,” a cop named Allen responds, one of two cops initially confronting David.

A third cop named Gonzalez then swaggers up and gets in David’s face while a cop named Hernandez orders him to cross the street which he complies.

But once he was standing on the sidewalk on the other side of the street, the cop named Hernandez walks up to him and knocks the phone out of his hand.

“Do not put the phone in my face!” Hernandez yells.

The phone lands on the sidewalk and continues recording while pointing skyward showing the cops grabbing him and forcing him to the ground, ordering to “stop resisting” as they are trained to do when beating non-resisting suspects.

“I’m not resisting!” David yells several times

The cops charged him with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest, which are the typical contempt of cop charges Florida cops like to fabricate when arresting people for recording them (it happened to me in 2007 in almost the same manner which is what led to the creation of this site).

The Miami New Times obtained the police report.

According to an arrest report obtained by New Times, the three officers arrived on the scene after Williams’ ex-girlfriend asked for assistance with removing some items from their home. The cops do not state in their arrest documents that Williams acted violently toward them — instead, an officer listed as W. Gonzalez stated he arrested Williams simply for getting too close to him with his cell phone.

“The defendant then continued to place his cellphone within very close proximity of my face, once again breaching the distance within my reactionary gap, at which point I advised the defendant that he was under arrest, at which point I grabbed the defendant by the arm and attempted to directed [sic] him to the ground to effect the arrest,” Gonzalez wrote. The officer further alleged that Williams continued to tense his body and that he entered a police vehicle only “after another struggle.”

Reached by phone, Williams tells New Times that when he arrived on the scene, the officers prevented him from entering his apartment without explaining why. After the officers told him to move across the street, he was confused why the trio then followed him to the other side, he says. Once the cops swatted his phone away, he was stunned that his phone wound up catching more of the incident by accident.

“I was shocked my phone even picked up the part after they knocked it out of my hand,” he says. “I only got my phone back after I got out of jail. I didn’t think my phone caught all that.”

If everything went down as reported, then the cops had no legal reason to force Williams across the street because he was not interfering with whatever it was they were doing with his ex-girlfriend.

“I’m more than 50 feet away from her,” Williams tells the cops as one tells him “you better stay back.”

But the video shows he expressed no intention of getting any closer. He was content just standing on the sidewalk recording, which is what got him arrested.

The videos were posted to Williams’ Instagram account. All three cops were wearing body cameras. No word yet on whether those bodycam videos will be released anytime soon. Or if they will somehow disappear.

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles