Amber Guyger Sentenced to Ten Years in Prison; Activists say Sentence too Light

Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger could have received life in prison without parole for murdering Botham Jean in his own apartment but ended up with a 10-year prison sentence Wednesday afternoon.

She will be eligible for parole in five years.

The 31-year-old woman could also have received as little as two years in prison after the judge told the jury they were allowed to consider that Guyger acted out of “sudden passion” when she killed Botham.

“Is ten years enough for a life being taken?” Dallas activist Dominique Alexander asked rhetorically in a television news interview.

According to the Dallas Morning News:

After the sentence was read out, chants of, “No justice, no peace,” broke out in the hallway.

Dee Crane, the mother of Tavis Crane, a young black man shot by an Arlington police officer in 2017, cried as she asked: “How many of us does it take to get justice?”

“What about my son? What about Botham Jean?” Crane said through tears. “How many of us is it going to take before you understand that our lives matter?”

Activist Dominique Alexander said the 10-year sentence was insufficient. He called on the community to attend a protest outside the courthouse at 6:30 p.m.

Botham Jean’s brother, Brandt Jean, then took the witness stand and said he forgave Amber Guyger. He then asked to give her a hug which he was allowed to do.

The two hugged for several long seconds as Guyger cried.

Watch the video below.

Former Dallas police officer Amber Guyger could have received life in prison without parole for murdering Botham Jean in his own apartment but ended up with a 10-year prison sentence Wednesday afternoon.

She will be eligible for parole in five years.

The 31-year-old woman could also have received as little as two years in prison after the judge told the jury they were allowed to consider that Guyger acted out of “sudden passion” when she killed Botham.

“Is ten years enough for a life being taken?” Dallas activist Dominique Alexander asked rhetorically in a television news interview.

According to the Dallas Morning News:

After the sentence was read out, chants of, “No justice, no peace,” broke out in the hallway.

Dee Crane, the mother of Tavis Crane, a young black man shot by an Arlington police officer in 2017, cried as she asked: “How many of us does it take to get justice?”

“What about my son? What about Botham Jean?” Crane said through tears. “How many of us is it going to take before you understand that our lives matter?”

Activist Dominique Alexander said the 10-year sentence was insufficient. He called on the community to attend a protest outside the courthouse at 6:30 p.m.

Botham Jean’s brother, Brandt Jean, then took the witness stand and said he forgave Amber Guyger. He then asked to give her a hug which he was allowed to do.

The two hugged for several long seconds as Guyger cried.

Watch the video below.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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