WATCH: Houston Cops Shoot and Kill Man in what appears to be another Botched Raid

Charion Lockett was sitting in the front seat of his car in the driveway of his house when he was shot and killed by Houston police serving an arrest warrant last month.

Police say they opened fire after the 27-year-old man opened fired at them first.

But body cam video shows he probably was not even aware they were cops.

After all, not only did the cops first pull up in an unmarked car, they never announced themselves as officers.

And not only was Lockett a licensed gun owner with a clean criminal record, he had earned a master’s degree in criminal justice and was planning on entering law school, according to family members, which does not exactly fit the profile of a man who needed to be taken down with a surprise raid.

On the other hand, the man who instigated the warrant, an old high school classmate of Lockett who accused him of aggravated assault with a weapon back in November, has an extensive criminal record, according to ABC 13, which does not make him the most credible victim. His name has not been released.

But Houston police took him at his word when they asked a judge to sign a warrant in December which was rejected. But they tried again last month and the judge signed the warrant.

The incident took place on February 7, 2022, just over three years after Houston police participated in a botched raid that resulted in two innocent people dying and two officers convicted on felony charges.

And like the previous incident, this one took place under questionable circumstances in how police obtained the warrant, acting solely on an unfounded accusation from an unreliable source without further investigation or due diligence.

Raising further questions is the allegation from Lockett’s mother, Shanette Lewis, that Houston police had called her earlier that day to inform her her son had a warrant which she said was the first her family had learned about it.

Lewis said her son also received a call that morning, about an hour before he was killed, accusing him of having missed a court date on February 4 which she says he did not know about.

“He’s a little shaken up,” attorney Tim Foley who is representing Lockette’s family, told the Associated Press.

“He goes and sits in his car, which according to mom is what he does on a regular basis. He sits in his car and he meditates and he prays.”

The fallout from the 2019 botched raid which was not caught on camera resulted in Houston police officers having to wear body cameras when conducting raids. Houston police also introduced a policy requiring body camera footage to be released to the public within 30 days in incidents resulting in death or injury.

As a result, Houston police released several body camera videos from the raid, allowing us to see with our own eyes what took place that day.

One video shows a cop riding passenger in the unmarked car opening his door and sticking his gun out when two gunshots can be heard, presumably from Lockett’s gun even though it is not visible in the video.

The plainclothes cop pulls his gun back into the car for a split-second after hearing the shots before sticking it out the door again and firing several times.

Seconds after the shooting, a marked police SUV pulls up and both cops begin firing. More cops arrive afterwards, most in unmarked cars.

Lockett was killed in the doorway of his house trying to run inside for safety.

“He’s down, he’s down,” says Houston police officer Deven Inocencio, the plainclothes cop who first opened fire.

“What did he shoot at?” another officer asks moments later.

“He shot at us in the Lincoln,” responds Inocencio.

In other words, Lockett had no idea he was shooting at police because the marked SUV, the second cop car to pull up to the scene, arrived seconds after the shooting started.

Watch the edited video below or all the unedited videos here.

Charion Lockette had a master’s in criminal justice and was planning on entering law school.

Houston’s Botched Police Raid is Case Study on how Cops Spin and Twist the Truth

 

 

 

Charion Lockett was sitting in the front seat of his car in the driveway of his house when he was shot and killed by Houston police serving an arrest warrant last month.

Police say they opened fire after the 27-year-old man opened fired at them first.

But body cam video shows he probably was not even aware they were cops.

After all, not only did the cops first pull up in an unmarked car, they never announced themselves as officers.

And not only was Lockett a licensed gun owner with a clean criminal record, he had earned a master’s degree in criminal justice and was planning on entering law school, according to family members, which does not exactly fit the profile of a man who needed to be taken down with a surprise raid.

On the other hand, the man who instigated the warrant, an old high school classmate of Lockett who accused him of aggravated assault with a weapon back in November, has an extensive criminal record, according to ABC 13, which does not make him the most credible victim. His name has not been released.

But Houston police took him at his word when they asked a judge to sign a warrant in December which was rejected. But they tried again last month and the judge signed the warrant.

The incident took place on February 7, 2022, just over three years after Houston police participated in a botched raid that resulted in two innocent people dying and two officers convicted on felony charges.

And like the previous incident, this one took place under questionable circumstances in how police obtained the warrant, acting solely on an unfounded accusation from an unreliable source without further investigation or due diligence.

Raising further questions is the allegation from Lockett’s mother, Shanette Lewis, that Houston police had called her earlier that day to inform her her son had a warrant which she said was the first her family had learned about it.

Lewis said her son also received a call that morning, about an hour before he was killed, accusing him of having missed a court date on February 4 which she says he did not know about.

“He’s a little shaken up,” attorney Tim Foley who is representing Lockette’s family, told the Associated Press.

“He goes and sits in his car, which according to mom is what he does on a regular basis. He sits in his car and he meditates and he prays.”

The fallout from the 2019 botched raid which was not caught on camera resulted in Houston police officers having to wear body cameras when conducting raids. Houston police also introduced a policy requiring body camera footage to be released to the public within 30 days in incidents resulting in death or injury.

As a result, Houston police released several body camera videos from the raid, allowing us to see with our own eyes what took place that day.

One video shows a cop riding passenger in the unmarked car opening his door and sticking his gun out when two gunshots can be heard, presumably from Lockett’s gun even though it is not visible in the video.

The plainclothes cop pulls his gun back into the car for a split-second after hearing the shots before sticking it out the door again and firing several times.

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Seconds after the shooting, a marked police SUV pulls up and both cops begin firing. More cops arrive afterwards, most in unmarked cars.

Lockett was killed in the doorway of his house trying to run inside for safety.

“He’s down, he’s down,” says Houston police officer Deven Inocencio, the plainclothes cop who first opened fire.

“What did he shoot at?” another officer asks moments later.

“He shot at us in the Lincoln,” responds Inocencio.

In other words, Lockett had no idea he was shooting at police because the marked SUV, the second cop car to pull up to the scene, arrived seconds after the shooting started.

Watch the edited video below or all the unedited videos here.

Charion Lockette had a master’s in criminal justice and was planning on entering law school.

Houston’s Botched Police Raid is Case Study on how Cops Spin and Twist the Truth

 

 

 

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Carlos Miller
Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Is it legal for a concealed carry holder to open fire on a car driving up fast? Even if he thought it wasn’t a cop how does that justify deadly force on the part of an armed citizen? and a CCW with a drum magazine in the Glock. Drum magazines typical for CCW holders nowadays huh? No, this wasn’t botched this was a criminal. You don’t even know what the raid was for and obviously were waiting for him to get out of the car

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