Wisconsin Cops that Killed Man Looking for Dog has not Released Body Cam Footage

When your dog goes missing, you go out looking for it.

That is exactly what Lucas Alvarado, 27, did on February 24, according to friends and family members.

Alvarado was approached by Milwaukee police officers around 1 a.m.

Alvarado disregarded police commands of removing his hands from his pockets and fled, according to Milwaukee’s Chief of Police Alfonso Morales.

While running, officers continued to tell Alvarado to stop running and show his hands. That is when Alvarado flashed a gun towards officers, according to officers on scene.

Alvarado ran about a block and a half before being fatally shot by one of the officers.

Every officer within the department has been outfitted to wear one since 2016. Typically, when an officer’s actions are justifiable, police departments will release it to the public.

According to Milwaukee police standard procedures body camera’s must be activated during: vehicle stops, impaired driver investigations, field interviews and pedestrian stops, transporting citizens or prisoners, searches of persons or property, dispatched calls for service, crime scenes, crash scenes (may be turned off if member is waiting on a tow truck and no additional enforcement activity is likely), advising a subject of Miranda warnings (in the field or without MediaSolv), suspect/witness statements and interviews, vehicle and foot pursuits, and emergency response to critical incidents.

The police department has not released body camera footage of the incident, but in neighbors security camera footage multiple shots can be heard before Alvarado falls to the ground.

Since the shooting, Alvarado’s girlfriend Jackie Hernandez has made a statement:

“Wrong time, wrong place. But I can say he was a good amazing father and he loved his kids. They won’t see their dad no more and they going to grow up without a father, I’ve got to get my kids ready for a funeral.”

In January, Alvarado was charged with five felonies. The charges were: two counts of second-degree recklessly endangering safety, armed robbery, substantial battery and eluding an officer.

Alvarado has also pled guilty to resisting or obstructing an officer three times in the past.

Three of the responding officers have been placed on administrative duty, according to Chief Morales.

When your dog goes missing, you go out looking for it.

That is exactly what Lucas Alvarado, 27, did on February 24, according to friends and family members.

Alvarado was approached by Milwaukee police officers around 1 a.m.

Alvarado disregarded police commands of removing his hands from his pockets and fled, according to Milwaukee’s Chief of Police Alfonso Morales.

While running, officers continued to tell Alvarado to stop running and show his hands. That is when Alvarado flashed a gun towards officers, according to officers on scene.

Alvarado ran about a block and a half before being fatally shot by one of the officers.

Every officer within the department has been outfitted to wear one since 2016. Typically, when an officer’s actions are justifiable, police departments will release it to the public.

According to Milwaukee police standard procedures body camera’s must be activated during: vehicle stops, impaired driver investigations, field interviews and pedestrian stops, transporting citizens or prisoners, searches of persons or property, dispatched calls for service, crime scenes, crash scenes (may be turned off if member is waiting on a tow truck and no additional enforcement activity is likely), advising a subject of Miranda warnings (in the field or without MediaSolv), suspect/witness statements and interviews, vehicle and foot pursuits, and emergency response to critical incidents.

The police department has not released body camera footage of the incident, but in neighbors security camera footage multiple shots can be heard before Alvarado falls to the ground.

Since the shooting, Alvarado’s girlfriend Jackie Hernandez has made a statement:

“Wrong time, wrong place. But I can say he was a good amazing father and he loved his kids. They won’t see their dad no more and they going to grow up without a father, I’ve got to get my kids ready for a funeral.”

In January, Alvarado was charged with five felonies. The charges were: two counts of second-degree recklessly endangering safety, armed robbery, substantial battery and eluding an officer.

Alvarado has also pled guilty to resisting or obstructing an officer three times in the past.

Three of the responding officers have been placed on administrative duty, according to Chief Morales.

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