NC Deputy With Media Training Forbids Reporter From Video Recording

A North Carolina deputy who had just gone through media training barred a television reporter from video recording the aftermath of a trailer fire that [__left one man dead__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/index1.html) last week.

The Beaufort County sheriff’s deputy told reporter Mike Valerio of WCTI-12 that he would not be allowed to shoot because doing so would jeopardize the investigation.

According to the [__Indie Register__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/#more-2053), which is operated by *PINAC* reader William Toler, who works at WCTI-12:

> Valerio was allowed onto nearby property owned by relatives and he decided to shoot from there. The same deputy approached him again and told him not to record.
> “He was forceful…even though I was on private property that a family member invited me onto,” Valerio said. “Shortly after I left the family member’s property and got back where they wanted me to be, he said they had just been through media training.”
> Later that day, News Director Shane Moreland made a call to Sheriff Alan Jordan. Chief Deputy Kit Campbell returned the call and said that the concern was for the family and that it would seem in poor taste to film the scene.
> “The government doesn’t tell us what’s tasteful or not,” Moreland said. “The community does.” After the conversation, Moreland reiterated to the newsroom to respect the crime scene but added, “They’re not going to tell us what to air.”

Obviously, the issue here is law enforcement trying to play news editor. No different than [__the incident__](http://www.pixiq.com/article/albuquerque-police-officer-chases-away-news-videographer) that took place in New Mexico a couple of days ago.

That incident prompted Mickey Osterreicher of the National Press Photographers Association to fire off [__a letter__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/albuquerque_police_letter_06_26_12.pdf) to Albuquerque Police Chief Ray Schultz, stating the following:

> It is neither a police officer’s duty nor right to decide what constitutes appropriate news coverage of any story. That is solely an editorial decision to be made by each news organization. It is also well established that there is no reasonable expectation of privacy on a public street. So long as news personnel are in a public forum and not violating any ordinances they have a right to gather news unfettered by the personal feelings or opinions of law enforcement. Anything less may be considered a form of prior restraint thus creating a chilling effect upon a free press.

A North Carolina deputy who had just gone through media training barred a television reporter from video recording the aftermath of a trailer fire that [__left one man dead__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/index1.html) last week.

The Beaufort County sheriff’s deputy told reporter Mike Valerio of WCTI-12 that he would not be allowed to shoot because doing so would jeopardize the investigation.

According to the [__Indie Register__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/#more-2053), which is operated by *PINAC* reader William Toler, who works at WCTI-12:

> Valerio was allowed onto nearby property owned by relatives and he decided to shoot from there. The same deputy approached him again and told him not to record.
> “He was forceful…even though I was on private property that a family member invited me onto,” Valerio said. “Shortly after I left the family member’s property and got back where they wanted me to be, he said they had just been through media training.”
> Later that day, News Director Shane Moreland made a call to Sheriff Alan Jordan. Chief Deputy Kit Campbell returned the call and said that the concern was for the family and that it would seem in poor taste to film the scene.
> “The government doesn’t tell us what’s tasteful or not,” Moreland said. “The community does.” After the conversation, Moreland reiterated to the newsroom to respect the crime scene but added, “They’re not going to tell us what to air.”

Obviously, the issue here is law enforcement trying to play news editor. No different than [__the incident__](http://www.pixiq.com/article/albuquerque-police-officer-chases-away-news-videographer) that took place in New Mexico a couple of days ago.

That incident prompted Mickey Osterreicher of the National Press Photographers Association to fire off [__a letter__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/albuquerque_police_letter_06_26_12.pdf) to Albuquerque Police Chief Ray Schultz, stating the following:

> It is neither a police officer’s duty nor right to decide what constitutes appropriate news coverage of any story. That is solely an editorial decision to be made by each news organization. It is also well established that there is no reasonable expectation of privacy on a public street. So long as news personnel are in a public forum and not violating any ordinances they have a right to gather news unfettered by the personal feelings or opinions of law enforcement. Anything less may be considered a form of prior restraint thus creating a chilling effect upon a free press.

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles