NY Police Pepper Spray Man, Confiscate Camera,for Flipping Officer Off

He ended up arrested and pepper sprayed with his camera seized as “evidence,” a clear indicator that Saratoga Springs police officer Nathan Baker was clueless about Constitutional law.

Or more likely, wasn’t going to allow it to interfere with a contempt-of-cop arrest.

The incident took place Saturday when Adam Rupeka of Cop Block pulled into town to investigate a tip that the Saratoga Springs Police Department was corrupt and abusive.

It didn’t take long for him to find out these allegations were true.

According to his Youtube description:

When I first arrived into the city I figured I would test them on Supreme Court rulings by giving the middle finger. Officer N. Baker decided he would illegally pull me over and arrest me for disorderly conduct. Even after being told the Supreme Court has ruled that a police officer may not initiate a traffic stop based on that reason. Officer Baker states that the local judge says its disorderly conduct. See the ruling here.
He pepper sprays me twice and twists my arm out of the car window. Puts the hand cuffs on so tight that my hands are losing circulation. He puts me in the back of the police car with the windows rolled up and refuses to open them or allow air to the back of the car. He states that they do not have a neutralizing agent for the pepper spray even after I tell him I am having trouble breathing.
Once at the police station I am still having issues breathing so I stand up and try to breath easier and 2 officers proceed to choke, knee, kick and punch me because I was standing.

Just to clarify Rupeka’s description, it is not a U.S. Supreme Court ruling because it has never reached that level. Numerous lower courts, including a federal appellate court, has ruled that flipping cops off is protected by the Constitution.

Rupeka was eventually taken to a hospital where a cop showed up and issued him a citation for disorderly conduct, asking permission to view footage recorded by the camcorder he had on his dash that captured the exchange.

When Rupeka told him he would not grant him permission to view his footage, Sergeant Jason Cadoret told him he would keep it until he obtains a warrant.

Rubeka said his phone and dash cam were returned to him, which is how he was able to post this video.

But obviously, police are holding on to the video that would incriminate the officer.

Call the Saratoga Springs Police Department at (518) 584-1800.

UPDATE: Officer Nathan Baker was placed on administrative leave today, according to the Times Union.

He ended up arrested and pepper sprayed with his camera seized as “evidence,” a clear indicator that Saratoga Springs police officer Nathan Baker was clueless about Constitutional law.

Or more likely, wasn’t going to allow it to interfere with a contempt-of-cop arrest.

The incident took place Saturday when Adam Rupeka of Cop Block pulled into town to investigate a tip that the Saratoga Springs Police Department was corrupt and abusive.

It didn’t take long for him to find out these allegations were true.

According to his Youtube description:

When I first arrived into the city I figured I would test them on Supreme Court rulings by giving the middle finger. Officer N. Baker decided he would illegally pull me over and arrest me for disorderly conduct. Even after being told the Supreme Court has ruled that a police officer may not initiate a traffic stop based on that reason. Officer Baker states that the local judge says its disorderly conduct. See the ruling here.
He pepper sprays me twice and twists my arm out of the car window. Puts the hand cuffs on so tight that my hands are losing circulation. He puts me in the back of the police car with the windows rolled up and refuses to open them or allow air to the back of the car. He states that they do not have a neutralizing agent for the pepper spray even after I tell him I am having trouble breathing.
Once at the police station I am still having issues breathing so I stand up and try to breath easier and 2 officers proceed to choke, knee, kick and punch me because I was standing.

Just to clarify Rupeka’s description, it is not a U.S. Supreme Court ruling because it has never reached that level. Numerous lower courts, including a federal appellate court, has ruled that flipping cops off is protected by the Constitution.

Rupeka was eventually taken to a hospital where a cop showed up and issued him a citation for disorderly conduct, asking permission to view footage recorded by the camcorder he had on his dash that captured the exchange.

When Rupeka told him he would not grant him permission to view his footage, Sergeant Jason Cadoret told him he would keep it until he obtains a warrant.

Rubeka said his phone and dash cam were returned to him, which is how he was able to post this video.

But obviously, police are holding on to the video that would incriminate the officer.

Call the Saratoga Springs Police Department at (518) 584-1800.

UPDATE: Officer Nathan Baker was placed on administrative leave today, according to the Times Union.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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