WATCH: Award-Winning Kentucky Cop Shoots Unarmed Man

Kentucky cops entered an abandoned home looking for a man who had been accused of using drugs outside the home Wednesday, shooting the man within a second of ordering him to show his hands.

The incident was captured on the officer’s body cam and released Thursday.

“Show your hands,” Louisville Metro police officer Sarah Stumler yells after discovering the man hiding behind a mattress leaning against the wall.

Then she fired her gun before even giving him a chance to show his hands, shooting Bruce Warrick once in the abdomen.

“Shit,” she says as the mattress and Warrick fall to the floor.

She then begins to administer first aid to the 38-year-old victim.

“You’re okay, just hold on,” Stumler says, who has received several awards and commendations over the years.

Now Warrick is listed in critical condition at a local hospital.

According to [__WDRB:__](http://www.wdrb.com/story/34651392/video-lmpd-releases-body-camera-footage-of-officer-shooting-man-in-west-louisville)

> It happened in the 2600 block of Magazine Street near 26th Street. Chief Steve Conrad said First Division officers responded to a complaint just after 11:30 a.m. of a man doing drugs next to an abandoned house.
> When officers arrived, they were told the man had gone into that house. More officers arrived, and three of them entered the house and announced their presence, Conrad said.
> They searched the house, and upon leaving, Officer Sarah Stumler saw Bruce Warrick hiding behind a mattress in one of the rooms. She ordered Warrick, a black male, to show his hands.
> Stumler then fired one shot, striking Warrick in the abdomen. Conrad said the officers called EMS and provided first aid while they waited for EMS to arrive. He explained why a taser was not used.
> “When officers are going into a situation where they don’t know what sort of force they may encounter, it is not unusual to see officers with their weapons out,” Chief Conrad said.

Chief Conrad said he has not formed a conclusion about whether the shooting was justified or not, but that it is being investigated by the department’s internal affairs department.

Carrick still has not been charged with any crimes, according to [__WLKY.__](http://www.wlky.com/article/lmpd-expected-to-release-bodycam-video-in-officer-involved-shooting/9084130)

Unlike many chiefs from other departments in the United States, Conrad does not waste any time in releasing body cam footage of police shooting suspects [__as he did last year__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/2016/08/12/body-cam-video-contradicts-kentucky-police-narrative-of-shooting-death/) on the same day of another questionable shooting in which the officers’ narrative contradicted what was seen on the video.

Kentucky cops entered an abandoned home looking for a man who had been accused of using drugs outside the home Wednesday, shooting the man within a second of ordering him to show his hands.

The incident was captured on the officer’s body cam and released Thursday.

“Show your hands,” Louisville Metro police officer Sarah Stumler yells after discovering the man hiding behind a mattress leaning against the wall.

Then she fired her gun before even giving him a chance to show his hands, shooting Bruce Warrick once in the abdomen.

“Shit,” she says as the mattress and Warrick fall to the floor.

She then begins to administer first aid to the 38-year-old victim.

“You’re okay, just hold on,” Stumler says, who has received several awards and commendations over the years.

Now Warrick is listed in critical condition at a local hospital.

According to [__WDRB:__](http://www.wdrb.com/story/34651392/video-lmpd-releases-body-camera-footage-of-officer-shooting-man-in-west-louisville)

> It happened in the 2600 block of Magazine Street near 26th Street. Chief Steve Conrad said First Division officers responded to a complaint just after 11:30 a.m. of a man doing drugs next to an abandoned house.
> When officers arrived, they were told the man had gone into that house. More officers arrived, and three of them entered the house and announced their presence, Conrad said.
> They searched the house, and upon leaving, Officer Sarah Stumler saw Bruce Warrick hiding behind a mattress in one of the rooms. She ordered Warrick, a black male, to show his hands.
> Stumler then fired one shot, striking Warrick in the abdomen. Conrad said the officers called EMS and provided first aid while they waited for EMS to arrive. He explained why a taser was not used.
> “When officers are going into a situation where they don’t know what sort of force they may encounter, it is not unusual to see officers with their weapons out,” Chief Conrad said.

Chief Conrad said he has not formed a conclusion about whether the shooting was justified or not, but that it is being investigated by the department’s internal affairs department.

Carrick still has not been charged with any crimes, according to [__WLKY.__](http://www.wlky.com/article/lmpd-expected-to-release-bodycam-video-in-officer-involved-shooting/9084130)

Unlike many chiefs from other departments in the United States, Conrad does not waste any time in releasing body cam footage of police shooting suspects [__as he did last year__](http://photographyisnotacrime.com/2016/08/12/body-cam-video-contradicts-kentucky-police-narrative-of-shooting-death/) on the same day of another questionable shooting in which the officers’ narrative contradicted what was seen on the video.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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