WATCH: New Video from Huntington Beach Police Shooting Death Surfaces

Contrary to what [__we reported earlier,__](https://photographyisnotacrime.com/2017/09/watch-california-cop-shoots-man-multiple-times-killing-him/) the victim of the Huntington Beach police shooting caught on video Friday was a 27-year-old Navy veteran named [__Dillon Tabares__](https://www.facebook.com/dillan.tabares) who graduated from Marina High School as opposed to a student currently enrolled at the same school.

The previous information was obtained from a Facebook post by a woman who said she spoke to a student who witnessed the shooting who told her he was a junior at the school, which is across the street from the 7-11 where the shooting took place.

Also, a new video surfaced recorded from a citizen sitting inside a parked car in front of the store that shows the moments that that took place before the struggle on the ground and shooting death.

The new video shows Tabares charging towards the cop as the officer points a taser at him, telling him to “have a seat.”

The cop also deploys his taser but it did not seem to have much effect on him because Tabares takes a swing at the cop, which was when the cop places him in a headlock.

The two then struggle for several seconds before falling to the ground. At one point, the cop appears to say “let go of my gun.”

The video we posted Friday shows Tabares take something from the officer’s belt – but it was not the gun because the officer then pulled out his gun and fired several times.

The Facebook page, [__Black Coat Media__](https://www.facebook.com/BlackCoatMedia/videos/119320862100467/), edited all three available videos together in sequence. We increased the volume of the video and posted it below to better hear what the cop is saying.

Huntington Beach police have not said much about the shooting, not even saying what the object was that Tabares removed from the officer’s belt, calling it “an undetermined piece of equipment.”

The man who recorded the initial two videos said it was an extra magazine for the cop’s gun, which clearly did not prevent the officer from shooting seven rounds from the existing magazine in his gun while ordering Tabares to “get on the ground.”

One of the bullets shattered the 7-11 window, grazing the arm of a clerk inside, leaving a bruise, according to the [__OC Weekly,__](http://www.ocweekly.com/news/fight-before-fatal-hb-cop-shooting-captured-in-new-video-8448620) which was the publication that obtained Tabares’ name.

> The man shot dead by Huntington Beach police was 27-year-old Dillan Tabares, the *Weekly* has learned. He graduated from Marina High School, where the shooting happened across the street from, in 2008. Tabares previously served in the United States Navy as an information systems technician and lived in Norfolk, Virgina. He fell on hard times in 2012 according to a Facebook post where he wrote about losing his security clearance in the Navy after testing positive for marijuana and that he self-medicated for depression.

It is still not clear why the officer approached Tabares in the first place, but a witness told the OC Weekly that the cop pulled up in his car and began following the man, barking orders, only for Tabares to walk away, before he turned around and charged the cop.

![](https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/maven-user-photos/pinacnews/citizen-journalism/LhlGTxQVnU-jb5b_cF6-uA/pqqkf-mRqkKyVcegHNjFjA)

Contrary to what [__we reported earlier,__](https://photographyisnotacrime.com/2017/09/watch-california-cop-shoots-man-multiple-times-killing-him/) the victim of the Huntington Beach police shooting caught on video Friday was a 27-year-old Navy veteran named [__Dillon Tabares__](https://www.facebook.com/dillan.tabares) who graduated from Marina High School as opposed to a student currently enrolled at the same school.

The previous information was obtained from a Facebook post by a woman who said she spoke to a student who witnessed the shooting who told her he was a junior at the school, which is across the street from the 7-11 where the shooting took place.

Also, a new video surfaced recorded from a citizen sitting inside a parked car in front of the store that shows the moments that that took place before the struggle on the ground and shooting death.

The new video shows Tabares charging towards the cop as the officer points a taser at him, telling him to “have a seat.”

The cop also deploys his taser but it did not seem to have much effect on him because Tabares takes a swing at the cop, which was when the cop places him in a headlock.

The two then struggle for several seconds before falling to the ground. At one point, the cop appears to say “let go of my gun.”

The video we posted Friday shows Tabares take something from the officer’s belt – but it was not the gun because the officer then pulled out his gun and fired several times.

The Facebook page, [__Black Coat Media__](https://www.facebook.com/BlackCoatMedia/videos/119320862100467/), edited all three available videos together in sequence. We increased the volume of the video and posted it below to better hear what the cop is saying.

Huntington Beach police have not said much about the shooting, not even saying what the object was that Tabares removed from the officer’s belt, calling it “an undetermined piece of equipment.”

The man who recorded the initial two videos said it was an extra magazine for the cop’s gun, which clearly did not prevent the officer from shooting seven rounds from the existing magazine in his gun while ordering Tabares to “get on the ground.”

One of the bullets shattered the 7-11 window, grazing the arm of a clerk inside, leaving a bruise, according to the [__OC Weekly,__](http://www.ocweekly.com/news/fight-before-fatal-hb-cop-shooting-captured-in-new-video-8448620) which was the publication that obtained Tabares’ name.

> The man shot dead by Huntington Beach police was 27-year-old Dillan Tabares, the *Weekly* has learned. He graduated from Marina High School, where the shooting happened across the street from, in 2008. Tabares previously served in the United States Navy as an information systems technician and lived in Norfolk, Virgina. He fell on hard times in 2012 according to a Facebook post where he wrote about losing his security clearance in the Navy after testing positive for marijuana and that he self-medicated for depression.

It is still not clear why the officer approached Tabares in the first place, but a witness told the OC Weekly that the cop pulled up in his car and began following the man, barking orders, only for Tabares to walk away, before he turned around and charged the cop.

![](https://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/maven-user-photos/pinacnews/citizen-journalism/LhlGTxQVnU-jb5b_cF6-uA/pqqkf-mRqkKyVcegHNjFjA)

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles