Former Georgia Deputy Shoots Unarmed Man who Knocked on his Door by Mistake

A former police chief and sheriff’s deputy in Georgia feared for his life when he heard a knock on his door one evening earlier this week, so he grabbed his gun and shot the man.

The victim had knocked on Jonathan Hills’ door by mistake, intending to knock on the house next door where his cousin lived.

Now George Hannah, 31, is recovering at a local hospital after having been shot once in the back and arm. The incident took place in Wren, Georgia around 10 p.m. Tuesday night.

Hills told local police that he shot Hannah because he had knocked on his door around 10 p.m. when he was not expecting company. H

ills also said Hannah knocked “aggressively” as if that would justify shooting an unarmed man who had made an honest mistake.

One news report even said Hannah “lunged” at Hills after the homeowner had opened the door but other reports are not saying that.

According to the Augusta Chronicle:

The homeowner, Jon Hills, a former Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office deputy and Stapleton Police Chief, told officers he heard someone pounding and banging on the door, Kitchens said. As Hills was not expecting company, he approached the door with his pistol.

“Hannah had opened the screen door and was leaning in so, Hills said, when he opened the door they were nearly face to face,” the police chief said. “According to Hills’ statement the victim was incoherent and he (Hills) couldn’t understand what he (Hannah) was saying. At some point, Hills said, Hannah grabbed at him and Hills shoved him and fired.”

The police chief said the .45 caliber bullet went through Hannah’s right arm and struck his lower back. Only one shot was fired.

“Hannah then staggered back to the carport and lay down in the driveway,” Kitchens said.

Hannah’s wife was in his car in the driveway when the shooting occurred, the chief said.

He was transported by ambulance to AU Medical Center, where Kitchens said Hannah was in stable condition after undergoing surgery.

Because of Hills’ previous employment with local law enforcement agencies, the Wrens Police Department asked the Georgia Bureau of Investigation to take over the case.

Hills was not nearly as aggressive when reporters came knocking on his door Wednesday, refusing to even open the door. But the Jefferson County Sheriff told reporters that Hills left the agency in December 2014 after 16 years of service for a better-paying job. It is unclear at this time when Hills served as Stapleton Police Chief.

Hills was not nearly as aggressive when reporters came knocking on his door Wednesday, refusing to even open the door. But the Jefferson County Sheriff told reporters that Hills left the agency in December 2014 after 16 years of service for a better-paying job. It is unclear at this time when Hills served as Stapleton Police Chief.

A former police chief and sheriff’s deputy in Georgia feared for his life when he heard a knock on his door one evening earlier this week, so he grabbed his gun and shot the man.

The victim had knocked on Jonathan Hills’ door by mistake, intending to knock on the house next door where his cousin lived.

Now George Hannah, 31, is recovering at a local hospital after having been shot once in the back and arm. The incident took place in Wren, Georgia around 10 p.m. Tuesday night.

Hills told local police that he shot Hannah because he had knocked on his door around 10 p.m. when he was not expecting company. H

ills also said Hannah knocked “aggressively” as if that would justify shooting an unarmed man who had made an honest mistake.

One news report even said Hannah “lunged” at Hills after the homeowner had opened the door but other reports are not saying that.

According to the Augusta Chronicle:

The homeowner, Jon Hills, a former Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office deputy and Stapleton Police Chief, told officers he heard someone pounding and banging on the door, Kitchens said. As Hills was not expecting company, he approached the door with his pistol.

“Hannah had opened the screen door and was leaning in so, Hills said, when he opened the door they were nearly face to face,” the police chief said. “According to Hills’ statement the victim was incoherent and he (Hills) couldn’t understand what he (Hannah) was saying. At some point, Hills said, Hannah grabbed at him and Hills shoved him and fired.”

The police chief said the .45 caliber bullet went through Hannah’s right arm and struck his lower back. Only one shot was fired.

“Hannah then staggered back to the carport and lay down in the driveway,” Kitchens said.

Hannah’s wife was in his car in the driveway when the shooting occurred, the chief said.

He was transported by ambulance to AU Medical Center, where Kitchens said Hannah was in stable condition after undergoing surgery.

Because of Hills’ previous employment with local law enforcement agencies, the Wrens Police Department asked the Georgia Bureau of Investigation to take over the case.

Hills was not nearly as aggressive when reporters came knocking on his door Wednesday, refusing to even open the door. But the Jefferson County Sheriff told reporters that Hills left the agency in December 2014 after 16 years of service for a better-paying job. It is unclear at this time when Hills served as Stapleton Police Chief.

Hills was not nearly as aggressive when reporters came knocking on his door Wednesday, refusing to even open the door. But the Jefferson County Sheriff told reporters that Hills left the agency in December 2014 after 16 years of service for a better-paying job. It is unclear at this time when Hills served as Stapleton Police Chief.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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