Woman Handcuffed at Victoria’s Secret after Returning with Paid Merchandise

Jovita Jones Cage bought a bra from Victoria’s Secret at a Tennessee mall, but the clerk forgot to remove the sensor.

When Cage brought the bra back to the store Monday with a receipt, asking for the sensor to be removed, the manager called the cops and had her handcuffed.

The Collierville police officer accused her of shoplifting but after searching her purse and realizing she did not steal anything, he released her.

But he still told her she was no longer welcome at Victoria’s Secret.

Cage, who is black, believes the incident was racially motivated.

After all, she did not do anything illegal but was still banned from the store.

According to WREG.com:

Jovita Jones Cage says she’d bought a bra from Victoria’s Secret, but the employee forgot to take the sensor off.

So she took it back with the receipt on Monday, explaining what happened.

“She got the receipts out and was able to find the right one and remove the sensor. I told her she could keep the bag there, because I was going to go shopping around the store,” Cage said.

As she was on her way to try the clothes on, she noticed a Collierville Police officer in the store.

“The police officer walked straight up to me and slapped handcuffs on me,” she said.

Cage says she was shocked and confused.

After asking what’s going on, she says the officer told her “to put both of my hands behind my back, because I was under arrest for shoplifting.”

This is at least the second time since December 2016 that Victoria’s Secret has accused black shoppers of shoplifting, banning them from the store even though they did not shoplift.

The last time took place in Alabama, prompting the company to offer a public apology and assuring the employee that banned the shopper was no longer working there.

Victoria’s Secrets released the following statement about the latest incident, also assuring the employee was no longer working there:

“We are sincerely sorry for the experience Ms. Jones Cage had in our store. Bottom line, we made a mistake, and we do not tolerate this behavior. Our head of stores has been trying to reach Ms. Jones Cage to personally apologize for her experience. Victoria’s Secret is adamant that all customers be treated with dignity and respect. We have investigated the matter, and the associate involved is no longer employed with our brand. In addition, we are meeting with every associate in the store to reinforce our values and policies.  We are committed to delivering an excellent shopping experience to every customer, every time … we have work to do – and we are dedicated to this mission.”

The company also offered her a $100 gift certificate for her humiliation, but she rejected it.

Cage, who attends Howard University and also tutors kids, was worried that somebody she knows would see her in handcuffs and assume the worst.

“I don’t know if one of the parents of the kids I tutor could’ve been there. I don’t know if one of my old professors could’ve been in there,” she told reporters.

Jovita Jones Cage bought a bra from Victoria’s Secret at a Tennessee mall, but the clerk forgot to remove the sensor.

When Cage brought the bra back to the store Monday with a receipt, asking for the sensor to be removed, the manager called the cops and had her handcuffed.

The Collierville police officer accused her of shoplifting but after searching her purse and realizing she did not steal anything, he released her.

But he still told her she was no longer welcome at Victoria’s Secret.

Cage, who is black, believes the incident was racially motivated.

After all, she did not do anything illegal but was still banned from the store.

According to WREG.com:

Jovita Jones Cage says she’d bought a bra from Victoria’s Secret, but the employee forgot to take the sensor off.

So she took it back with the receipt on Monday, explaining what happened.

“She got the receipts out and was able to find the right one and remove the sensor. I told her she could keep the bag there, because I was going to go shopping around the store,” Cage said.

As she was on her way to try the clothes on, she noticed a Collierville Police officer in the store.

“The police officer walked straight up to me and slapped handcuffs on me,” she said.

Cage says she was shocked and confused.

After asking what’s going on, she says the officer told her “to put both of my hands behind my back, because I was under arrest for shoplifting.”

This is at least the second time since December 2016 that Victoria’s Secret has accused black shoppers of shoplifting, banning them from the store even though they did not shoplift.

The last time took place in Alabama, prompting the company to offer a public apology and assuring the employee that banned the shopper was no longer working there.

Victoria’s Secrets released the following statement about the latest incident, also assuring the employee was no longer working there:

“We are sincerely sorry for the experience Ms. Jones Cage had in our store. Bottom line, we made a mistake, and we do not tolerate this behavior. Our head of stores has been trying to reach Ms. Jones Cage to personally apologize for her experience. Victoria’s Secret is adamant that all customers be treated with dignity and respect. We have investigated the matter, and the associate involved is no longer employed with our brand. In addition, we are meeting with every associate in the store to reinforce our values and policies.  We are committed to delivering an excellent shopping experience to every customer, every time … we have work to do – and we are dedicated to this mission.”

The company also offered her a $100 gift certificate for her humiliation, but she rejected it.

Cage, who attends Howard University and also tutors kids, was worried that somebody she knows would see her in handcuffs and assume the worst.

“I don’t know if one of the parents of the kids I tutor could’ve been there. I don’t know if one of my old professors could’ve been in there,” she told reporters.

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles