Louisiana Cops Arrest Woman for Posting Video of Fight between High School Teens

Police in Louisiana are using an obscure law nobody has heard about to arrest a woman for posting a video of two teen boys fighting on school grounds.

Maegan Adkins-Barras, 32, was charged with unlawful posting of criminal activity for notoriety and publicity, which carries a maximum sentence of six months in jail, according to the Advocate.

She was arrested earlier today. She remains in jail without a bond at this time.

However, the law, introduced in 2008, only applies to “a person who is either a principal or accessory to a crime,” neither which applies to her.

It appears as if the Adkins-Barras may have been critical of police and school administrators in her Facebook post, which is likely the real reason she was arrested because “her friends said she was concerned about what was going on at her school and was questioning the response from officials,” according to Heavy.

It is believed her son may have recorded the video at Acadia High School and passed it on to her.

Scott Police Chief Chad Leger said Adkins-Barras should have contacted police about the fight instead of posting the video, which shows he has a different interpretation of the law, posting the following on his Facebook page.

“Parents who receive information concerning criminal activity on school campuses are urged to contact their local police department or school administration. Posting videos and photos of illegal activity on social media is against the law in the State of Louisiana. Violators of the law could be fined not more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned for not more than six months, or both.”

Under that interpretation, police would be guilty as well because they are always posting videos of illegal activity to help track down the criminals, which is a good thing.

The fight took place Tuesday at Arcadia High School in the LaFayette Unified School District.

The video she recorded is included in the above news clips. The names of the boys have not been released but they will be expelled.

The boy in the video who shoved the other boy, causing him to hit his head on concrete, was charged with second-degree battery. The other boy was charged with disturbing the peace.

He was diagnosed at a hospital and determined to have suffered no trauma.

Attorneys and law professors interviewed by the Advocate said the arrest of Adkins-Barras reeks of desperation. We agree.

Police in Louisiana are using an obscure law nobody has heard about to arrest a woman for posting a video of two teen boys fighting on school grounds.

Maegan Adkins-Barras, 32, was charged with unlawful posting of criminal activity for notoriety and publicity, which carries a maximum sentence of six months in jail, according to the Advocate.

She was arrested earlier today. She remains in jail without a bond at this time.

However, the law, introduced in 2008, only applies to “a person who is either a principal or accessory to a crime,” neither which applies to her.

It appears as if the Adkins-Barras may have been critical of police and school administrators in her Facebook post, which is likely the real reason she was arrested because “her friends said she was concerned about what was going on at her school and was questioning the response from officials,” according to Heavy.

It is believed her son may have recorded the video at Acadia High School and passed it on to her.

Scott Police Chief Chad Leger said Adkins-Barras should have contacted police about the fight instead of posting the video, which shows he has a different interpretation of the law, posting the following on his Facebook page.

“Parents who receive information concerning criminal activity on school campuses are urged to contact their local police department or school administration. Posting videos and photos of illegal activity on social media is against the law in the State of Louisiana. Violators of the law could be fined not more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned for not more than six months, or both.”

Under that interpretation, police would be guilty as well because they are always posting videos of illegal activity to help track down the criminals, which is a good thing.

The fight took place Tuesday at Arcadia High School in the LaFayette Unified School District.

The video she recorded is included in the above news clips. The names of the boys have not been released but they will be expelled.

The boy in the video who shoved the other boy, causing him to hit his head on concrete, was charged with second-degree battery. The other boy was charged with disturbing the peace.

He was diagnosed at a hospital and determined to have suffered no trauma.

Attorneys and law professors interviewed by the Advocate said the arrest of Adkins-Barras reeks of desperation. We agree.

- Advertisement -

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Miller
Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles