WATCH: Michigan Deputy Speeding with No Lights and Siren Strikes Kid on Minibike

Dashcam video released this week shows a Michigan sheriff’s deputy driving 66 mph in a 30 mph speed zone when he struck an 11-year-old boy on a mini-bike.

The video shows the boy swerving in front of the deputy when he was struck. The video also shows the Calhoun County sheriff’s deputy waited almost a minute before stepping out of his patrol car to approach the boy who was laying in the middle of the street.

The deputy whose name has not been released did not have his emergency lights or siren activated but the sheriff’s office said he was on his way to a burglary call.

The boy’s minibike did not have lights nor was it street legal. And even if it was, he would still too young to operate it under the law.

The incident took place on May 28 around 9:30 p.m. In September, prosecutors declined to file charges against the deputy.

but the boy’s family has filed a lawsuit, seeking $25 million in damages. Watch the video above. Audio does not come on until :32 in the video.

This is what his mother, Christina Valadez, had to say:

I understand that he did not intentionally kill my son. I understand he was doing his job, probably trying to save a life. But I want him to take acknowledgement that he took my son’s life. There’s no denying that,” Valadez said. “Let this have been anybody else. Let me have struck and killed an 11-year-old kid. I would be behind bars. You’d be behind bars. Everybody’d be behind bars.”​

​This is what his sisters had to say, according to Fox 17.

Neveah and Regina Hale believe that Norman’s chance of survival could have been improved had the deputy tried to perform life-saving measures. According to video, CPR and resuscitating measures were not done in the minutes prior to the paramedics’ arrival.

“He didn’t treat him like he was a human,” said Regina Hale. “He didn’t look for a pulse. He didn’t do CPR. He just flashed a light in his face.”

When asked if relatives believe the deputy’s speed resulted in Norman’s death, they answered yes. They also believe Norman would not have tried to cross the street if the deputy’s emergency lights were on.

Jackson County Prosecutor Jerard Jarzynka said he did not file charges because he did not believe he could prove criminal charges beyond a reasonable doubt.

Dashcam video released this week shows a Michigan sheriff’s deputy driving 66 mph in a 30 mph speed zone when he struck an 11-year-old boy on a mini-bike.

The video shows the boy swerving in front of the deputy when he was struck. The video also shows the Calhoun County sheriff’s deputy waited almost a minute before stepping out of his patrol car to approach the boy who was laying in the middle of the street.

The deputy whose name has not been released did not have his emergency lights or siren activated but the sheriff’s office said he was on his way to a burglary call.

The boy’s minibike did not have lights nor was it street legal. And even if it was, he would still too young to operate it under the law.

The incident took place on May 28 around 9:30 p.m. In September, prosecutors declined to file charges against the deputy.

but the boy’s family has filed a lawsuit, seeking $25 million in damages. Watch the video above. Audio does not come on until :32 in the video.

This is what his mother, Christina Valadez, had to say:

I understand that he did not intentionally kill my son. I understand he was doing his job, probably trying to save a life. But I want him to take acknowledgement that he took my son’s life. There’s no denying that,” Valadez said. “Let this have been anybody else. Let me have struck and killed an 11-year-old kid. I would be behind bars. You’d be behind bars. Everybody’d be behind bars.”​

​This is what his sisters had to say, according to Fox 17.

Neveah and Regina Hale believe that Norman’s chance of survival could have been improved had the deputy tried to perform life-saving measures. According to video, CPR and resuscitating measures were not done in the minutes prior to the paramedics’ arrival.

“He didn’t treat him like he was a human,” said Regina Hale. “He didn’t look for a pulse. He didn’t do CPR. He just flashed a light in his face.”

When asked if relatives believe the deputy’s speed resulted in Norman’s death, they answered yes. They also believe Norman would not have tried to cross the street if the deputy’s emergency lights were on.

Jackson County Prosecutor Jerard Jarzynka said he did not file charges because he did not believe he could prove criminal charges beyond a reasonable doubt.

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Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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