Fabricated Felony Charges Dismissed against Man Beaten in Contempt of Cop Arrest

All Stephen Sings wanted to know was why were the sheriff’s deputies arresting his son at a high school football last December.

But when he asked them, they attacked him; tackling, punching and tasering him 11 times before arresting him on false felony charges that he attacked them.

It was your typical contempt of cop arrest, an obvious fabrication of the facts, but it took prosecutors more than nine months to dismiss a total of 12 charges against him.

And when they did last week, they offered no explanation as to why nor did they explain why it took so long to dismiss the charges.

But had it not been for the fact that Sings was livestreaming on Facebook Live, he would likely still be facing the charges. He is now preparing to sue the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office.

There’s also a chance the deputies might be charged but let’s not hold our breath for that to happen.

According to the Richmond County Daily Journal:

Sings was charged with two felony counts of assault inflicting physical injury on a law enforcement officer, five misdemeanor counts of resisting a public officer, three misdemeanor counts of assault on a government official, and one misdemeanor count each of injury to personal property and disorderly conduct. He was placed under a $150,000 secure bond at the Richmond County Jail.

District Attorney Reece Saunders dismissed these charges last week after multiple continuances, but declined to explain his reasoning in an interview Wednesday. Court documents state only that, “The state elects not to proceed” on each of the charges.

”I can’t elaborate on it, I don’t like to do that,” Saunders said. “If I explain my decision in any case I will do nothing but explain because we make these decisions all day every day.”

The State Bureau of Investigation took over the case in the days after the arrest, and completed their investigation last month. Saunders’ office received their report at the end of August. The SBI’s investigation looked into both Sings’ arrest and the conduct of the sheriff’s deputies that were involved in his arrest, and it is up to Saunders whether to issue charges or any disciplinary action against the officers.

Sing’s son, Stephen Kernal Sings, is still facing a misdemeanor charge of disorderly conduct. He is scheduled to appear in court on October 30. He was arrested after entering the game.

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All Stephen Sings wanted to know was why were the sheriff’s deputies arresting his son at a high school football last December.

But when he asked them, they attacked him; tackling, punching and tasering him 11 times before arresting him on false felony charges that he attacked them.

It was your typical contempt of cop arrest, an obvious fabrication of the facts, but it took prosecutors more than nine months to dismiss a total of 12 charges against him.

And when they did last week, they offered no explanation as to why nor did they explain why it took so long to dismiss the charges.

But had it not been for the fact that Sings was livestreaming on Facebook Live, he would likely still be facing the charges. He is now preparing to sue the Richmond County Sheriff’s Office.

There’s also a chance the deputies might be charged but let’s not hold our breath for that to happen.

According to the Richmond County Daily Journal:

Sings was charged with two felony counts of assault inflicting physical injury on a law enforcement officer, five misdemeanor counts of resisting a public officer, three misdemeanor counts of assault on a government official, and one misdemeanor count each of injury to personal property and disorderly conduct. He was placed under a $150,000 secure bond at the Richmond County Jail.

District Attorney Reece Saunders dismissed these charges last week after multiple continuances, but declined to explain his reasoning in an interview Wednesday. Court documents state only that, “The state elects not to proceed” on each of the charges.

”I can’t elaborate on it, I don’t like to do that,” Saunders said. “If I explain my decision in any case I will do nothing but explain because we make these decisions all day every day.”

The State Bureau of Investigation took over the case in the days after the arrest, and completed their investigation last month. Saunders’ office received their report at the end of August. The SBI’s investigation looked into both Sings’ arrest and the conduct of the sheriff’s deputies that were involved in his arrest, and it is up to Saunders whether to issue charges or any disciplinary action against the officers.

Sing’s son, Stephen Kernal Sings, is still facing a misdemeanor charge of disorderly conduct. He is scheduled to appear in court on October 30. He was arrested after entering the game.

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Carlos Miller
Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

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