NJ Cop Strikes and Kills Man with Car before Placing Body in Back Seat and Driving it Home to Mother in Attempted Coverup

Despite being a fully certified police officer and coming from a family of cops, Louis Santiago evidently had no clue what to do after striking a pedestrian on the side of the road in the early hours of November 1.

The off-duty Newark cop first fled the scene rather than stop and render aid to the victim, a 29-year-old nurse named Damian Z. Dymka, who was dressed as a werewolf after having celebrated Halloween hours earlier.

But Santiago returned to the scene several times afterwards with his passenger, Albert Guzman, until eventually lifting the victim’s body in the back seat of his 2005 Honda Accord and driving it to the home he shared with his parents, according to a press release from the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office.

The body remained in the back seat of the car while Santiago and Guzman discussed with Santiago’s mother inside the house what to do with the body. Santiago eventually drove back to the scene with the body still in the back seat of the Honda.

Meanwhile, Santiago’s father, Luis Santiago, a lieutenant with the Newark Police Department, called 911 to report his son had been in an accident, according to the press release.

New Jersey state police arrived and found the body in the back seat of Santiago’s car but it took nearly three weeks before charges were filed on November 18.

In fact, New Jersey state police initially reported to the media that the driver who killed Dymka had remained at the scene and cooperated with police, making no mention of his name or the fact he was a cop.

Charges against Santiago include reckless vehicular homicide, desecrating human remains, leaving the scene of a deadly accident, endangering an injured victim and two counts of official misconduct.

Guzman and Annette Santiago face charges of hindering apprehension, conspiracy to desecrate human remains and tampering with physical evidence.

Luis Santiago, the father who has spent 18 years with the Newark Police Department, will not be facing charges, the prosecutor’s office said.

Despite being a fully certified police officer and coming from a family of cops, Louis Santiago evidently had no clue what to do after striking a pedestrian on the side of the road in the early hours of November 1.

The off-duty Newark cop first fled the scene rather than stop and render aid to the victim, a 29-year-old nurse named Damian Z. Dymka, who was dressed as a werewolf after having celebrated Halloween hours earlier.

But Santiago returned to the scene several times afterwards with his passenger, Albert Guzman, until eventually lifting the victim’s body in the back seat of his 2005 Honda Accord and driving it to the home he shared with his parents, according to a press release from the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office.

The body remained in the back seat of the car while Santiago and Guzman discussed with Santiago’s mother inside the house what to do with the body. Santiago eventually drove back to the scene with the body still in the back seat of the Honda.

Meanwhile, Santiago’s father, Luis Santiago, a lieutenant with the Newark Police Department, called 911 to report his son had been in an accident, according to the press release.

New Jersey state police arrived and found the body in the back seat of Santiago’s car but it took nearly three weeks before charges were filed on November 18.

In fact, New Jersey state police initially reported to the media that the driver who killed Dymka had remained at the scene and cooperated with police, making no mention of his name or the fact he was a cop.

Charges against Santiago include reckless vehicular homicide, desecrating human remains, leaving the scene of a deadly accident, endangering an injured victim and two counts of official misconduct.

Guzman and Annette Santiago face charges of hindering apprehension, conspiracy to desecrate human remains and tampering with physical evidence.

Luis Santiago, the father who has spent 18 years with the Newark Police Department, will not be facing charges, the prosecutor’s office said.

Support our Mission

Help us build a database of bad cops

For almost 15 years, PINAC News has remained active despite continuous efforts by the government and Big Tech to shut us down by either arresting us for lawful activity or by restricting access to our readers under the pretense that we write about “social issues.”

Since we are forbidden from discussing social issues on social media, we have created forums on our site to allow us to fulfill our mission with as little restriction as possible. We welcome our readers to join our forums and support our mission by either donating, volunteering or both.

Our plan is to build a national database of bad cops obtained from public records maintained by local prosecutors. The goal is to teach our readers how to obtain these lists to ensure we cover every city, county and state in the country.

After all, the government has made it clear it will not police the police so the role falls upon us.

It will be our most ambitious project yet but it can only be done with your help.

But if we succeed, we will be able to keep innocent people out of prison.

Please make a donation below or click on side tab to learn more about our mission.

Subscribe to PINAC

Bypass Big Tech censorship.

Carlos Millerhttps://pinacnews.com
Editor-in-Chief Carlos Miller spent a decade covering the cop beat for various newspapers in the Southwest before returning to his hometown Miami and launching Photography is Not a Crime aka PINAC News in 2007. He also published a book, The Citizen Journalist's Photography Handbook, which is available on Amazon.

Leave a Reply

- Advertisement -

Latest articles